Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Traditional Dutch landscape under threat

16.12.2008
Green areas of Randstad region need specific agricultural policy

Current government policy is failing to protect traditional Dutch landscapes says Dutch researcher Evelien van Rij. Green areas in the Randstad region with cultural historic value will disappear unless specific agricultural policy is developed for them. This will require both considerable investments and sufficient legislation from the Dutch government.

Evelien van Rij investigated possible improvements to rules and policy programmes for green areas on urban fringes. Her most important recommendation is that a distinction should be made in agricultural policy between traditional Dutch landscapes which are used for recreation in the Randstad region, and other agricultural areas in the rest of the Netherlands.

Long-term planning
Slow planning must take centre stage in the policy for beautiful traditional Dutch landscapes in the Randstad region: the planning rules, the ownership structure and the attractiveness of the area must together keep the urban dynamic out of these areas and guarantee their continued existence in the longer term. Spatial planning and, in particular, land-use plans are important, but without additional agricultural policy they do not provide enough protection. As the government is opting less and less for additional policy measures, such as land consolidation and land purchase, the continued existence of green areas is under serious threat.
Cultural history costs money
Van Rij investigated the reconstruction of Midden-Delfland, building developments to cross-subsidise green developments in the Bloemendalerpolder and the national landscape Laag Holland. The most effective approach for maintaining green areas consists of a combination of physical interventions to make green areas attractive, spatial planning measures to prohibit new constructions via land-use plans, and the purchase of land, for example, to protect areas from project developers. Agricultural land ownership can be kept viable by consolidating government land and leasing it for a low price. However, the financial resources required for such an approach are considerable. New concepts such as cross-subsidy strategies, in which the profits from new developments are invested in green areas, are suitable for less attractive landscapes with a minimal recreational function, but do not usually contribute to the retention of a green area with cultural historic value. Merely the suspicion that new developments are possible can push up land prices and threaten the landscape.
Money and rules from the government
Van Rij is of the opinion that the Dutch central government has a critical role to play in preserving green areas because it is in a position to make budgets available and make new legislation. Dutch municipalities and landowners usually tend to choose in favour of new developments.

The doctoral research ’Improving institutions for green landscapes in metropolitan areas’ was carried out at the OTB Research Institute of Delft University of Technology as part of the NWO programme Social Scientific Research into Nature and the Environment (GaMON). The research is affiliated to the Habiforum programme Innovative use of space.

Kim van den Wijngaard | alfa
Further information:
http://www.nwo.nl/nwohome.nsf/pages/NWOA_7LPLHY_Eng

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Climate change, population growth may lead to open ocean aquaculture
05.10.2017 | Oregon State University

nachricht New machine evaluates soybean at harvest for quality
04.10.2017 | University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Ocean atmosphere rife with microbes

17.10.2017 | Life Sciences

Neutrons observe vitamin B6-dependent enzyme activity useful for drug development

17.10.2017 | Life Sciences

NASA finds newly formed tropical storm lan over open waters

17.10.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>