Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New Spout Nearly Doubles Maple Production, Has 1 Million Advance Orders

20.08.2009
An innovative new maple spout developed by the University of Vermont’s Proctor Maple Research Center with funding from the U.S. Department of Agriculture secured by Senator Patrick J. Leahy, will have a dramatic impact on maple syrup production and will boost job creation and economic development.

The new spout will increase sap yields by 50 to 90 percent per tree.

The announcement was made at Progressive Plastics in Williamstown, Vt., which began commercial production of the device, called a check valve spout, on August 17. Progressive Plastics is manufacturing the spout for Leader Evaporating Company of Swanton, Vt., which licensed the technology from UVM and will market and sell it.

Blocking backflow

The check valve technology was invented by Timothy Perkins, director of the Proctor Maple Research Center. It employs a valve -- a small ball that rolls back and forth in a chamber within the spout -- to block the flow back into the tree of sap containing bacteria.

All tapped maple trees pull sap back into their tap holes, as they try to balance the negative pressure established both by natural process and by vacuum tubing systems, which are pervasive in the industry. Bacterial backflow in turn causes the tree’s natural defense system to wall off the contaminated area of the tap hole, essentially plugging it and ending a sugarmaker’s season. Such walling off typically occurs late in the season.

By allowing the tree’s sap to continue to flow, the new spout will extend the sugarmaking season by one-and-a-half to two-and-a-half weeks, according to testing conducted by the Proctor and confirmed by Leader’s field testing. The sugaring season is typically four weeks long.

The tap could also mitigate the effect of global warming on the Vermont maple industry. Warming has shortened the Vermont maple season by 10% over the last 40 years, according to research conducted by Perkins.

1 million advance orders

Although Leader has not yet listed the spout in its catalog or on its web site, the company has already received 1 million advance orders. Leader is projecting sales of three million units this maple season, making the spout its number one selling product. In the future, sales could be significantly higher.

According to Gary Gaudette, president of Leader Evaporator, the check valve spout could have a revolutionary impact on the maple industry.

“It’s going to add as much to syrup and sap production as vacuum tubing did.

I’m confident that this is going to be the thing to use in the future.” There are between 50 and 55 million taps in use in North America, Gaudette said.

Both Leader and Progressive Plastics are in hiring mode despite the recession, leadership at both companies said, and both anticipate the new spout will add further to their need to bring on new staff.

Jeff Wakefield | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.uvm.edu

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Researchers discover a new link to fight billion-dollar threat to soybean production
14.02.2017 | University of Missouri-Columbia

nachricht Important to maintain a diversity of habitats in the sea
14.02.2017 | University of Gothenburg

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Impacts of mass coral die-off on Indian Ocean reefs revealed

21.02.2017 | Earth Sciences

Novel breast tomosynthesis technique reduces screening recall rate

21.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Use your Voice – and Smart Homes will “LISTEN”

21.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>