Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Russia has potential to become the world’s leading wheat export nation

27.11.2014

IAMO scholars present their latest research findings

In the coming decades, the global demand for agricultural products will rise substantially. Russia has ample scope for increasing agricultural production because more than 40 million hectares of former cropland have been abandoned since the dissolution of the Soviet Union, and because grain yields remain much lower than the yields achieved elsewhere in conditions that are naturally comparable.


Set-aside land in Russia, Photo: Alexander Prishchepov

A new paper shows that Russia can substantially increase its wheat production and become the leading international exporter under conservative assumptions of yield increases and modest re-cultivation of its unused land resources.

Schierhorn, together with colleagues at the Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Development in Transition Economies (IAMO) and the University of Alberta, Canada, calibrated a crop growth model to simulate potential wheat yields for 28 key wheat growing areas in Russia between 1995 and 2006.

Optimizing fertilizer supply can raise average wheat yields by 1.2 to 3.0 t/ha, and combined with irrigation the yields could increase by as much as 1.8 to 4.6 t/ha. These results were recently published in the journal Environmental Research Letters.

Based on yield simulations and maps of abandoned cropland, the research team quantified the potential for Russia to increase its wheat production based on productivity increases and land expansion.

In the journal Global Food Security, the authors show that higher land productivity is the key for enlarging wheat production, whereas re-cultivation of the abandoned croplands will only generate minor production increases, when carbon costs resulting from re-cultivation are accounted for.

The researchers demonstrate that, under conservative scenarios of yield gap closure and the re-cultivation of the recently abandoned croplands, Russia could increase its wheat production by up to 32 million tons, or 62% above production in 2013, and become the world’s leading wheat exporter (for comparison, Germany harvested a total of 25 million tons of wheat in 2013). However, substantial investments in infrastructure, education and research as well as institutional and political reform are vital for attaining these production increases.

Further information

Schierhorn, F., Faramarzi, M., Prishchepov, A., Koch, F., Müller, D. (2014): Quantifying yield gaps in wheat production in Russia, Environmental Research Letters, Vol. 9, No. 8. (open access). http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-9326/9/8/084017

Schierhorn, F., Müller, D., Prishchepov, A., Faramarzi, M., Balmann, A. (in press): The potential of Russia to increase its wheat production through cropland expansion and intensification, Global Food Security (open access). http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211912414000479 

Photo downloads at: www.iamo.de/fileadmin/Presse/Pressefoto_Brachflaechen_in_Russland_Foto_Alexander_Prishchepov.JPG

About IAMO

The Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Development in Transition Economies (IAMO) analyzes economic, social and political processes of change in the agricultural and food sector, and in rural areas. The geographic focus covers the enlarging EU, transition regions of Central, Eastern and South Eastern Europe, as well as Central and Eastern Asia. IAMO works to enhance the understanding of institutional, structural and technological changes. Moreover, IAMO studies the resulting impacts on the agricultural and food sector as well as the living conditions of rural populations. The outcomes of our work are used to derive and analyze strategies and options for enterprises, agricultural markets and politics. Since its founding in 1994, IAMO has been part of the Leibniz Association, a German community of independent research institutes.

Academic contact

Florian Schierhorn
Department Structural Development of Farms and Rural Areas
Tel.: +49 345 2928-335
Fax: +49 345 2928-399
schierhorn@iamo.de

Media contact

Daniela Schimming
Public Relations
Tel.: +49 345 2928-330
Fax: +49 345 2928-499
presse@iamo.de
www.iamo.de  

Daniela Schimming | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht New gene for atrazine resistance identified in waterhemp
24.02.2017 | University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

nachricht Researchers discover a new link to fight billion-dollar threat to soybean production
14.02.2017 | University of Missouri-Columbia

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New pop-up strategy inspired by cuts, not folds

27.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Sandia uses confined nanoparticles to improve hydrogen storage materials performance

27.02.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

Decoding the genome's cryptic language

27.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>