Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Determining teak durability in record time

13.11.2007
The market value of teak is continuing to rise. It is appreciated for its resistance to degrading agents, and also for its aesthetic and technological properties.

The teak currently on the market primarily comes from plantations in some thirty tropical countries. In effect, while global demand is continuing to grow, the natural forests in which teak originated are disappearing or are now protected. However, the natural durability of plantation teak can vary substantially from one tree to another. While wood from natural forests is in durability class 1 (highly durable) or 2 (durable), in some cases, plantation teak varies between class 1 and class 4 (slightly durable)*.

Laboratory studies of teak natural durability take 40 weeks to produce results. Researchers from CIRAD and its partners have managed to overcome this constraint, and developed a method that takes just a few minutes. Their brainwave was to correlate the analysis of teak natural durability with the variability of its chemical composition as revealed by near-infrared spectroscopy.

The first step for the researchers was to collect several hundred teak samples from trees of different ages, primarily from Togo, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Malaysia and Burma. The natural durability of wood depends on the age of the tree, its environment (soil, climate, geographical origin) and its genome. It is also closely linked to the nature of the chemical constituents (terpene and phenolic compounds, etc) that give it its natural resistance. The wood preservation laboratory subsequently determined the durability class of the samples based on the loss of mass caused by exposing them to wood-eating fungi (Antrodia sp. and Coriolus versicolor). Lastly, the researchers correlated the loss of mass for each sample with its near-infrared absorbency.

The database they compiled makes it possible to predict the natural durability class of teak samples within a few minutes. The wood sample - a core sample around 1.5 cm in diameter - is sliced and placed in front of the "eye" of the spectrometer, providing data that can be analysed using the database, which now contains the characteristics of more than 5000 teak samples from some ten countries, taken from plantations aged between 5 and 40 years, and from natural forests. It will be supplemented regularly with new samples, particularly from Asia, South America and Central America, where teak is a boom crop. Broadening the range of samples will help to improve the accuracy of durability predictions. The database could also provide geneticists with a new tool for use in breeding improved teak varieties.

* The natural durability of wood with respect to various degrading agents is assessed based on a European standard (EN350-1). As regards wood-eating fungi, durability is ranked from class 1 (highly durable) to class 5 (non-durable).

Helen Burford | alfa
Further information:
http://www.cirad.fr/en/actualite/communique.php?id=795

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Researchers discover a new link to fight billion-dollar threat to soybean production
14.02.2017 | University of Missouri-Columbia

nachricht Important to maintain a diversity of habitats in the sea
14.02.2017 | University of Gothenburg

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

From rocks in Colorado, evidence of a 'chaotic solar system'

23.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

'Quartz' crystals at the Earth's core power its magnetic field

23.02.2017 | Earth Sciences

Antimicrobial substances identified in Komodo dragon blood

23.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>