Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Research on grey mould offers possible breakthrough in tomato cultivation

16.04.2007
Tomato growers are likely to soon be able to cultivate new tomato varieties without having to use pesticides against grey mould (Botrytis cinerea). This is the conclusion of the STW-sponsored thesis by Richard Finkers from Wageningen University, with which he hopes to earn his doctorate on 3 April 2007. Finkers designed highly efficient methods whereby tomato varieties can be resistant to grey mould. The leading company De Ruiter Seeds is already applying these methods in its breeding programme.

Finkers started off with wild tomato accessions that were resistant to grey mould. When crossing the resistant wild tomato Solanum habrochaites LYC4 with the susceptible S. lycopersicum cv. Moneymaker, he identified two areas with resistant genes in the DNA.

This, however, did not explain all the variations in resistance. With this in mind, Finkers next made a step-by-step scan of the entire genome of the wild tomato to identify locations that have an effect on resistance. Ten areas were found that accommodated resistance factors against grey mould. DNA-markers were then developed for each area to be able to track the presence of each resistance factor in breeding programmes.

Resistant tomatoes for sale

With help of the DNA-markers, the identified areas can now be intentionally introgressed in the breeding programmes of De Ruiter Seeds, a Dutch company with a global reputation in the field. Using the DNA-markers, it expects to market new tomatoes that are resistant to grey mould in the near future. The new varieties will mean tomato growers will have to devote far less resources – or perhaps none at all – to combating B. cinerea.

An additional benefit of these new tomatoes is that they will be more suitable for closed glasshouse cultivation. This new type of glasshouse has a higher atmospheric humidity that actually increases the chance of grey mould activity. By providing tomato varieties resistant to grey mould, De Ruiter Seeds will fill a worldwide need that has long been around.

The research was partly financed by STW (the Technology and Sciences Association) and De Ruiter Seeds. As the developed knowledge obtained from this research has been patented, and therefore both protected and made accessible.

Richard Finkers | alfa
Further information:
http://www.nwo.nl/nwohome.nsf/pages/NWOA_6ZPA4C_Eng

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Microjet generator for highly viscous fluids
13.02.2018 | Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology

nachricht Sweet route to greater yields
08.02.2018 | Rothamsted Research

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Contacting the molecular world through graphene nanoribbons

19.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

When Proteins Shake Hands

19.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

Cells communicate in a dynamic code

19.02.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>