Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

A universal early diagnostic test for anthurium bacterial blight

19.01.2007
The first symptoms of bacterial blight in anthuriums - family Araceae - are oily-looking leaf spots, which give way to yellowing and necrosis. The infection can rapidly become systemic and kill the plant.

The infectious disease, caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae, almost entirely wiped out anthurium production in the West Indies in the 1980s.

The bacterium was accidentally introduced into Réunion in 1997 through contaminated plants from the Netherlands. An eradication campaign was launched, with the destruction of all the plants in affected nurseries and a ban on sales. It was made compulsory to import anthuriums in the form of in vitro plantlets, with an 18-month quarantine period to acclimatize them to the conditions in Réunion.

CIRAD launched a research programme in conjunction with the Réunion Plant Protection Service and players in the anthurium supply chain. The aim was to find more effective ways of inspecting imported plants. A reliable molecular tool is now available to detect the bacterium.

The tool is both specific and sensitive

The tool was developed in two stages. Firstly, the aim was to build a collection that was representative of the global genetic and pathogenic diversity of the bacterium. To this end, researchers collected bacterial cultures from all the zones affected by the disease. The results showed that the bacteria that affect Araceae make up a genetically heterogeneous group, not all of which affect anthuriums. The diversity was characterized using two techniques: AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism), which serves to compare individuals two by two for a large number of characters in the genome, and tests measuring pathogenicity on various plants from the family Araceae.

Researchers subsequently worked to develop a reliable, universal detection tool capable of detecting all the bacterial strains that may cause the disease, regardless of their geographical origin. The results were conclusive: in addition to the initial conditions, the tool proved to be specific - it does not detect non-pathogenic strains - and sensitive - it detects strains even if the plants are only slightly infected, with no visible symptoms.

Improved checks on imported plants and a 50% reduction in the quarantine period

Detection is based on a gene amplification technique (PCR): it is one of the genes of the bacterium that is detected. To this end, it was thus first necessary to identify a large number of potential target genes with the genome of the bacterium by determining which were present in the bacterium in question but not in others. Lastly, the research meant using the DNA sequence to check, a posteriori, that the target gene was indeed unique and corresponded to one of the bacterium's vital functions. This guaranteed that it would be found in almost every strain of the bacterium.

The tool has a wide range of applications. It is now possible to diagnose infection quickly. The tool can also be used on a larger scale, to monitor nurseries and check imported plants as they enter the country. Moreover, the quarantine period imposed on importers has been halved. The tool can also be applied under certification schemes aimed at producing disease-free plant material. Patents have been taken out in France and the Netherlands. Lastly, there are plans to apply to have the tool approved by the European Plant Protection Organization (EPPO) as an official diagnostic method.

Helen Burford | alfa
Further information:
http://www.cirad.fr/en/actualite/communique.php?id=607

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht New gene for atrazine resistance identified in waterhemp
24.02.2017 | University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

nachricht Researchers discover a new link to fight billion-dollar threat to soybean production
14.02.2017 | University of Missouri-Columbia

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>