Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

EU-imposed standards helped revamp Ugandan fisheries sector

26.10.2006
The Ugandan fisheries sector has successfully adjusted to a ban on its fish exports imposed by the European Union in the late 90s. Ms. Rose Kiggundu, a PhD candidate at UNU-MERIT - a joint research and training centre of United Nations University, and Maastricht University in the Netherlands – has completed a detailed analysis of what happened next.

Her dissertation titled: "Innovation Systems and Development: The Journey of a Beleaguered Nile Perch Fishery in Uganda," documents the actions taken by a complex network of local and international organizations, helping to bring about the renewal of the sector. Kiggundu will defend her thesis at Maastricht University on 26 October 2006.

In the late 90s, the the European Union imposed a set of Sanitary and PhytoSanitary (SPS) standards on Uganda’s fish exports. This led to a conditional ban of one of Uganda’s important exports as the country’s fish processing and export industry was unable to meet the new exporting requirements.

Consequently, the industry was plunged into a hard-hitting export crisis and for a prolonged period fish processing firms were locked out of their biggest and most lucrative export market. Export revenues fell at a time when revenues from traditional commodity exports (coffee in particular) were also falling. Fish processing plants were forced to close in order to restructure. Jobs were lost and fishing communities lost their main source of livelihood. In response, Uganda’s fish processing and exporting industry successfully engaged in a complex process of learning and innovation that has resulted in substantial gains for Uganda’s economy.

To analyse how this positive result came about Kiggundu compared 48 firms – meat, fruit, fish byproducts, grain processors and bakeries - with the fish export firms hit by the EU product standards. The results indicate that the availability of new technologies to comply with the EU-standards was not sufficient. It took a concerted effort of government, international development agencies, the industry association, some buyers and local as well as foreign firms to make the change possible.

This battle may have been successfully won, but the war is far from over. “The government of Uganda played a central role and it worked,” says Kiggundu, “...but the government was rather reactive. Government policies were not part of a well coordinated proactive public policy to catch up or move ahead of the technological standards of developed countries. Critical linkages in the system are still lacking and more structural improvements are still needed.”

Kiggundu also found that while financial services in Uganda did improve in the process, they are not yet sufficiently equipped to support innovation needs.

But the study has demonstrated, contrary to the belief of some observers, that the imposition of product standards on developing countries can have some positive effects. “The imposition of standards can be and is sometimes used for the protection of markets, but it can also improve the market, as was the case for Uganda’s fish exporters,” Kiggundu concludes.

Wangu Mwangi | alfa
Further information:
http://www.merit.unu.edu

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Researchers discover a new link to fight billion-dollar threat to soybean production
14.02.2017 | University of Missouri-Columbia

nachricht Important to maintain a diversity of habitats in the sea
14.02.2017 | University of Gothenburg

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Microhotplates for a smart gas sensor

22.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Scientists unlock ability to generate new sensory hair cells

22.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Prediction: More gas-giants will be found orbiting Sun-like stars

22.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>