Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Cotton: Malian producers will be paying the price

09.03.2006
Cotton is one of the main cogs in the machinery of the African economy: it accounts for 60% of agricultural export revenue and 5 to 10% of GDP in producing countries, and supports 10 million people, including 3.3 million in Mali.

Moreover, excluding subsidies, the cotton sector is competitive and exports more than 90% of what it produces. However, over the past ten years or so, the huge subsidies granted to producers in the United States (US$ 2.3 billion in 2001/2002), China ($ 1.2 billion in 2001/2002) and Europe ($ 700 million per year) have driven down cotton fibre prices. The price per kg dropped from $ 2.53 in 1995 to $ 0.82 in 2001.

To counter this fall, Mali adopted a reform in January 2005 of the mechanism for determining the price paid to seed cotton producers. The new agreement was a radical step: the basic price is now linked to the world market price, rather than to production costs. The purchasing price per kg of “grade one” cotton fell from CFAF 210 in 2004 to between CFAF 160 and 175 in 2005. Moreover, the minimum price system is no longer guaranteed. What will be the short- and medium-term consequences of the reform for producers and the Malian cotton commodity chain as a whole? To answer that question, CIRAD conducted a field study in the Malian cotton-growing zone, funded by the NGO OXFAM. The results speak for themselves.

On a microeconomic level, applying the new purchasing price will undoubtedly result in a negative margin for producers. In effect, the price will generally not be sufficient to cover seed cotton production costs. Moreover, given that the new price mechanism will result in a drop in incomes among cotton producers (around CFAF 30 billion) and rural populations, it will probably exacerbate poverty in Mali.

On a macroeconomic level, the likely loss for the Malian economy as a whole will be between CFAF 62.32 and 136.5 billion, corresponding to a drop of between 1.86 and 3.9% in the country’s GDP. Moreover, the new mechanism has been introduced at a time when the commodity chain is also suffering from major difficulties linked to the Compagnie malienne de développement textile’s financial problems, while input costs are rising and yields are falling in the cotton-growing zone. This is compounded by the fall in export revenue and in incomes among cotton producers as a result of the price slump.

These various points raise another, broader issue: are the Millennium Development Goals initiated by the United Nations and the Doha agenda* being implemented under the World Trade Organization coherent and above all compatible? Achieving the Millennium Development Goals, particularly a 50% reduction in global poverty by 2015, means implementing determined public policies that are mostly out of step with the increasing liberalization imposed under the Doha Round.

Kako Nubukpo | alfa
Further information:
http://www.cirad.fr/en/actualite/communique.php?id=382

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Energy crop production on conservation lands may not boost greenhouse gases
13.03.2017 | Penn State

nachricht How nature creates forest diversity
07.03.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>