Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New analytical methods for the study of abiotic contaminants in foodstuffs

11.10.2005


Professor Ramón Barrio´s research team at the Department of Analytical Chemistry of the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) has developed a series of new analytical methodologies in order to tackle the the problem of the persistence of certain commonly used pesticicides in ecosystems such as forests and agricultural land.



The characterisation of pesticicide residues in various matrixes and in kinetic studies on degradation as a function of meteorological parameters provided us with knowledge about the persistence and mobility of the chosen compounds. Also, optimised dosages and application systems were proposed in order to avoid unnecesary environmental risks and minimise their subsequent appearance in products aimed for human consumption.

The characterisation of these compounds involved working with chromatographic techniques (LC-MS, GC-MS) and voltampermetric ones (microsensors based on molecular imprint polymers), at times using the equipment of the Central Analysis Service of the UPV/EHU (www.ehu.es/inves/central_analisis.htm).


One of the sectors of production with which the research team worked most was the wine producing sector. A number of agreements have been signed with public bodies such as the Basque Government Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Technology Centres and with a number of bodegas (wineries) from the Rioja Alavesa, in order to investiagate aspects regarding dosage for the prevention of plant diseases.

Also, the presence of minority organic compounds of an endogenic origin, generated either by the plant itself or in the processes of transformation, affects areas of food safety. Within the framework of the aforementioned agreements, studies relating to the quality of grape earmarked for wine production were carried out (involving parameters such as glucose, fructose, polyphenols index, pH, Brix grade and malic, tartaric and gluconic acids). Also studied was the detection and control of the genesis of biogenic amines in the processes of wine making (compounds associated with the intolerance to wine by persons that have a diamino-oxidase enzyme defect, which produces an excess in the absorption of these amines and, in turn, produces severe migraine-type headaches).

Garazi Andonegi | alfa
Further information:
http://www.basqueresearch.com

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Cascading use is also beneficial for wood
11.12.2017 | Technische Universität München

nachricht The future of crop engineering
08.12.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Biochemie

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

Im Focus: Virtual Reality for Bacteria

An interdisciplinary group of researchers interfaced individual bacteria with a computer to build a hybrid bio-digital circuit - Study published in Nature Communications

Scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have managed to control the behavior of individual bacteria by connecting them to a...

Im Focus: A space-time sensor for light-matter interactions

Physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (run jointly by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics) have developed an attosecond electron microscope that allows them to visualize the dispersion of light in time and space, and observe the motions of electrons in atoms.

The most basic of all physical interactions in nature is that between light and matter. This interaction takes place in attosecond times (i.e. billionths of a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

Blockchain is becoming more important in the energy market

05.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New research identifies how 3-D printed metals can be both strong and ductile

11.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

11.12.2017 | Materials Sciences

What makes corals sick?

11.12.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>