Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Bioinsecticide for combating a pest that affects the tomato and the green bean

02.09.2005


The tomato fruitworm is the name given to an insect pest which, due to its polyphagous character, causes very serious damage to a number of plants, such as the tomato and the green bean. Its danger is greater if one takes into account the fact that this pest has developed resistances to chemical insecticides, including tot he latest ones. Thus, a Crop Protection research team from the Public University of Navarra have started work on developing a bioinsecticide that can be used as an alternative control measure.



The research project is called “Characterisation of isolated multiple Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus for its development as an active material in bioinsecticides”.

A worldwide pest


The Helicoverpa armigera insect, the scientific name for the tomato fruitworm, is found widely distributed throughout Europe, the Middle East, Africa and Oceania, where it is considered to be a very serious pest. In Spain it has been traditionally one of the most important pests in cotton and maize but, since more than a decade ago, it has become a feared pest for several vegetable crops. These insects have a predilection for fruit, penetrating into their interior, on which they feed and frequently emigrating from one fruit to another and capable of destroying several during its larval stage.

Control of this pest with synthetic organic insecticides, apart from the toxicity and environmental problems arising from their use, is turning out to be of little efficacy due to the great capacity the organism has for developing resistances to a great variety of active materials.

Thus the need to put into place alternative control measures, outstanding amongst which is the biological control with baculovirus, a virus exclusive to insect pathogens, and which show a great number of properties favourable to being developed as bioinsecticides.

Contrasted experience

There currently exist some 40 products available in different countries for different species of lepidoptera pests, the active material being baculovirus. Amongst these are some that are specially developed for the control of H. armigera in cotton, but there are still no products specific for vegetable crops.

This is precisely the aim of the mentioned research group from the Public University of Navarra: to design a bioinsecticide that can be used as a control measure. In concrete, as a first stage – that corresponding to the research team -, the biochemical and biological characterisation of the most specific strains of H. armigera found in the extensive collection of baculovirus available to the team will be undertaken. Then, those strains showing the best biological characteristics for their future development as bioinsecticides will be selected.

This first stage is to last two years – to the end of next year, 2006, approximately -, and the completed development of the bioinsecticide could take another two years.

It should be pointed out that the Crop Protection research team from the Public University of Navarra have undertaken, over its 11 years of research, important work on the development of baculovirus as bioinsecticides.The team is currently working together with a company to design a highly effective product against the larvae of Spodoptera exigua, another lepidoptero important in market gardening.

Irati Kortabitarte | alfa
Further information:
http://www.basqueresearch.com
http://www.elhuyar.com

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht New gene for atrazine resistance identified in waterhemp
24.02.2017 | University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

nachricht Researchers discover a new link to fight billion-dollar threat to soybean production
14.02.2017 | University of Missouri-Columbia

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>