Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


ADE-ADE-BIOTEC present their first on-site plant for the treatment of pig purines


The novelty of the system lies in the possibility of having an on-site installation at the farm itself, thus avoiding the transport of the purines to other, off-site plants for their treatment.

ADE Biotec has undertaken the treatment of these residues in locations in Gipuzkoa, other areas of the Basque Country and a patented technology. In the case in hand, the purine treatment plant is installed on a pig farm at Egiluze in Renteria (Gipuzkoa).

Nowadays, the purines (excrement mixed with waste water from the farm) represent one of the most serious problems in agriculture, both from an environmental perspective (massive use thereof produces contamination of the water table and land) as well as for, an economic point of view (waste management demands much time and effort).

The kernel of the problem lies in the intensification of agriculture: farms have increasingly greater numbers of animals. This, logically, produces an increase in purines on the farmlands, and also an increase in the amount of land where this fertiliser is used.

The new technique for the purification of purines is based on electroflotation and involves in transferring the purine from one iron plate to another while a low-voltage electric current is passed between the two electrodes. By means of this electro technique, two phenomena are observed:

  • On the one hand, the iron from the plates (Fe+2) is dissolved, coagulating and flocculating the organic material from the purine. In this way, the organic material takes the form of small balls that can be subsequently separated with ease from the liquid.
  • On the other hand, hydrogen bubbles are formed, which make the balls of organic material float on the water and create an upper layer that can be extracted easily.

In this way, more than 80% of the oxygen consumed by the compounds that oxidise in the water – phosphorous and nitrogen – can be removed from the purines.

Other advantages of this technique are its low cost, the fact that there is no need for chemical reagents an there is no limitation of scale and its easy automation.

Irati Kortabitarte | alfa
Further information:

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Forest Management Yields Higher Productivity through Biodiversity
14.10.2016 | Technische Universität München

nachricht Farming with forests
23.09.2016 | University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences (ACES)

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Greater Range and Longer Lifetime

26.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VDI presents International Bionic Award of the Schauenburg Foundation

26.10.2016 | Awards Funding

3-D-printed magnets

26.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

More VideoLinks >>>