Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Hurricane damage creates pecan shortage


Rich pecan pie is a long-time favorite dessert of the holiday season. But this year, the amount of pecans harvested will be dramatically down due to substantial damage from the 2004 hurricanes, say plant health specialists with The American Phytopathological Society (APS).

Pecan growers in Georgia and Alabama, two of the primary pecan growing areas were already expecting a light production year due to reduced nut set on many cultivars, said Tim Brenneman, APS member and plant pathologist with the University of Georgia. "But then the hurricanes came late in the growing season and caused tremendous damage to pecan crops in these two states," he said.

Georgia, which normally produces 120 million pounds of pecans annually, lost an estimated 50 percent of its already reduced pecan crop. Alabama, which took a direct hit from Hurricane Ivan, lost 80 percent of its total crop. Damage to the pecan trees include pecans blown prematurely from the limbs, twisted limbs and limb breakage, as well as severe tree leaning and loss of entire trees. Approximately 15-20 percent of all pecan trees in the state of Alabama were destroyed. "We aren’t yet certain of the full effect the damage has had on the remaining trees," said Brenneman. "There’s evidence that some trees may not fully recover," he said. Many farmers have tried to save the injured trees by using tractors to pull the trees straight and remove damaged limbs.

Pecan trees take many years to get into full production. The stress on damaged trees may affect pecan production for years to come. "Next year’s crop is dependent on the health of the trees when they go into winter," said Brenneman.

Another problem brought on by the hurricanes is increased pecan disease. One disease that normally doesn’t appear, Phytophthora shuck and kernel rot, has appeared in the middle of the Georgia pecan growing area. The disease, caused by a fungus-like organism, occurs when there is an extended period of cool, wet weather much like the weather caused by the hurricanes. The disease causes the kernel to discolor and rot, rendering it inedible. "The appearance of this disease has really compounded the situation," said Brenneman. Plant health specialists are working with growers to control the outbreak of this disease.

Amy Steigman | EurekAlert!
Further information:

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Forest Management Yields Higher Productivity through Biodiversity
14.10.2016 | Technische Universität München

nachricht Farming with forests
23.09.2016 | University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences (ACES)

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Novel light sources made of 2D materials

Physicists from the University of Würzburg have designed a light source that emits photon pairs. Two-photon sources are particularly well suited for tap-proof data encryption. The experiment's key ingredients: a semiconductor crystal and some sticky tape.

So-called monolayers are at the heart of the research activities. These "super materials" (as the prestigious science magazine "Nature" puts it) have been...

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Steering a fusion plasma toward stability

28.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Bioluminescent sensor causes brain cells to glow in the dark

28.10.2016 | Life Sciences

Activation of 2 genes linked to development of atherosclerosis

28.10.2016 | Life Sciences

More VideoLinks >>>