Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Cool temperatures chill soybean growth, specialist says

16.06.2004


Soybean crops planted weeks ago appear in no hurry to grow. Others aren’t turning a rich green in color. And while growers might be starting to worry, there’s no need to fret, said Ellsworth Christmas, Purdue University Extension soybean specialist.



"There are two basic questions producers have at this time," Christmas said. "No. 1, why are soybeans that have emerged growing so slowly? And, secondly, why are the plants yellow or very light green in color? Both of those concerns are directly related to temperatures - both of the air and the soil."

Although temperatures are beginning to heat up, conditions during and just after planting weren’t warm enough to activate soybean plants, Christmas said.


"If you go back almost three weeks from June 5, you’ll find temperatures have been very, very cool at night," he said. "Across the northern third of Indiana, most of the nighttime lows have been in the mid- to upper 40s, with a few in the low 40s at selected sites around that area. In central and southern Indiana, temperatures have been in the low to mid-50s.

"Those temperatures are too low for good, vigorous soybean growth. A soybean plant’s growth will slow when nighttime temperatures reach 60 degrees. When nighttime temperatures reach 40 degrees, the plant essentially stops growing for two to three days until those nighttime temperatures rise to or above 60 degrees. Any beans planted during the period of time when soil temperatures were in the 60-degree range or lower emerged rather slowly. Now, beans are emerging in about five days or less because of very warm soil conditions."

Soybeans thrive at soil temperatures between 70 degrees and 80 degrees. Most Indiana soils have been in that ideal range since Monday (June 7).

Slow growth could result in additional plant stress but should not reduce soybean yields, Christmas said.

"The long-term effect is that lower internodes on soybean plants will remain short," he said. "If you look at the length of those internodes, they are relatively short and will not lengthen. That length is fixed once the leaf reaches its full size, and then the internode below that leaf is fixed. That means that podding could be a little low on the plant this year, and that’s a risk."

Sluggish growth also has hindered soybean plants from taking on deeper green hues. That problem is mostly cosmetic, Christmas said.

"In terms of plant color, that’s caused by a nitrogen deficiency," he said. "Cool soil temperatures not only impact plant growth but also bacterial growth. Bacteria are the organisms that fix the nitrogen in the nodules on a soybean plant. Normally, nodules do not supply an adequate amount of nitrogen to the soybean plant until that plant reaches about V4 stage of growth."

The V4 growth stage is vegetative and refers to the number of trifoliolates - or three-leaf clusters - on the plant.

Source: Ellsworth Christmas, (765) 494-6373, echristmas@purdue.edu

Ag Communications: (765) 494-2722; Beth Forbes, forbes@purdue.edu
Agriculture News Page

Steve Leer | Purdue News
Further information:
http://news.uns.purdue.edu/UNS/html3month/2004/040611.Christmas.soybeans.html

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Six-legged livestock -- sustainable food production
11.05.2017 | Faculty of Science - University of Copenhagen

nachricht Elephant Herpes: Super-Shedders Endanger Young Animals
04.05.2017 | Universität Zürich

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can the immune system be boosted against Staphylococcus aureus by delivery of messenger RNA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a feared pathogen (MRSA, multi-resistant S. aureus) due to frequent resistances against many antibiotics, especially in hospital infections. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have identified immunological processes that prevent a successful immune response directed against the pathogenic agent. The delivery of bacterial proteins with RNA adjuvant or messenger RNA (mRNA) into immune cells allows the re-direction of the immune response towards an active defense against S. aureus. This could be of significant importance for the development of an effective vaccine. PLOS Pathogens has published these research results online on 25 May 2017.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium that colonizes by far more than half of the skin and the mucosa of adults, usually without causing infections....

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

How herpesviruses win the footrace against the immune system

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Water forms 'spine of hydration' around DNA, group finds

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

First Juno science results supported by University of Leicester's Jupiter 'forecast'

26.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>