Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Development of new food additives extracted from the solid residue of tomatoes

26.01.2004


In Europe, 8.5 million tons of tomatoes are cultivated annually. 1.5 million tons are sold directly to the consumer and 7 million are processed for products such as ketchup, sauces, etc. During this processing, some 40% of the tomato raw material ends up as residue mainly skin and seeds. The seeds, considered by the processing industry simply as waste or used as animal feed, is still an excellent source of nutrients such as carotenoids, proteins, sugars, fibre, wax and oils, these oils being nutritionally very valuable for their high unsaturated fats content.



Continuing with its line of research for evaluating food subproducts, the Basque research center AZTI is participating in the European project TOM (2003-2004), together with a consortium of European R&D companies and technological centres, to obtain natural food additives.

The fundamental aim of the European TOM project is the evaluation of this residue for obtaining and purification of these high-value nutritional compounds and their use as ingredients in the formulation and manufacture of functional foods or of foodstuffs the consumption of which provides additional health benefits, i.e. other than those nutrients provided by their intrinsic composition. The extraction of these substances will provide additional benefits and a significant reduction in the tomato residue generated in the tomato processing industry, up to 30%.


The purified compounds will be free of those solvents commonly used in other methods and possible remains of pesticides due to the peculiarities of this process, based on the technology known as affinity chromatography, which is to be applied on an industrial scale. In order to obtain the first crude extracts, conventional and "clean" environmental methods such as the extraction with water and supercritical CO2. The component extracted will be subsequently purified with affinity chromatography to a level of purity greater than ninety-eight per cent, given the low cost of the raw material and the special features of this process, a significant reduction in production costs is expected and, therefore, a lower price for the products obtained in comparison to similar or less pure products currently in the market.

Contact :
Raul Lopez de Gereñu
AZTI FUNDAZIOA
rgerenu@suk.azti.es
(+34) 946029400

Garazi Andonegi | Basque research
Further information:
http://www.basqueresearch.com/berria_irakurri.asp?Gelaxka=1_1&Berri_Kod=397&hizk=I

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht New 3-D model predicts best planting practices for farmers
26.06.2017 | Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

nachricht Fighting a destructive crop disease with mathematics
21.06.2017 | University of Cambridge

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

Leipzig HTP-Forum discusses "hydrothermal processes" as a key technology for a biobased economy

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers create new technique for manipulating polarization of terahertz radiation

20.07.2017 | Information Technology

High-tech sensing illuminates concrete stress testing

20.07.2017 | Materials Sciences

First direct observation and measurement of ultra-fast moving vortices in superconductors

20.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>