Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

’Biofumigants’ to help beat the wilt

15.09.2003


Poor farmers in developing countries could soon be using a range of ’biofumigant’ plants to help increase tropical vegetable yields.



CSIRO is part of a research team from Australia and the Philippines which has found that brassica species such as radish, mustard or broccoli can be used to help reduce yield losses from Bacterial Wilt - the major pathogen of vegetables in tropical farming.

"Brassicas contain compounds that suppress pests and pathogens, principally isothiocyanates (ITCs)," says CSIRO Plant Industry researcher, Dr John Kirkegaard.


"When ITCs are released by manuring, soil-borne pests and pathogens are suppressed and yields of solanaceous vegetables such as potatoes, tomatoes and eggplants can be increased by up to 40 per cent. The effect is known as ’biofumigation’."

The project has already evaluated brassica species and management techniques with the aim of maximising the biofumigant effect. Current field trials in the Philippines and in North Queensland are examining ways of making biofumigation practical and effective for developing countries.

Using brassicas to manage soil-borne pests is not new - there are many previous reports of disease suppression - but new insights and techniques to measure the processes involved in the release of chemicals in soil has provided opportunities to enhance the reliability of the effect.

"The project builds on that research and is making it practical for small-scale farmers around the world," Dr Kirkegaard says.

"There are economic and social benefits for small-scale farmers, as improved crop yields lead to increased incomes. There are also a range of environmental and health benefits, as a result of reduced reliance on toxic fumigants and synthetic pesticides.

"The next stage of the project seeks farmer involvement to integrate biofumigation into the cropping system, using farming networks throughout South-East Asia and the Pacific."

The team includes researchers from CSIRO Plant Industry, the Queensland Department of Primary Industry and the Philippines National Crop Protection Centre. The project is funded by the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR).

More information
Dr John Kirkegaard, CSIRO Plant Industry, 02 6246 5095
Email: john.kirkegaard@csiro.au

Bill Stephens | CSIRO
Further information:
http://www.csiro.au/index.asp?type=mediaRelease&id=Prbiofumigants

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Kakao in Monokultur verträgt Trockenheit besser als Kakao in Mischsystemen
18.09.2017 | Georg-August-Universität Göttingen

nachricht Ultrasound sensors make forage harvesters more reliable
28.08.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Zerstörungsfreie Prüfverfahren IZFP

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

Im Focus: Fast, convenient & standardized: New lab innovation for automated tissue engineering & drug

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems Holding GmbH about commercial use of a multi-well tissue plate for automated and reliable tissue engineering & drug testing.

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems...

Im Focus: Silencing bacteria

HZI researchers pave the way for new agents that render hospital pathogens mute

Pathogenic bacteria are becoming resistant to common antibiotics to an ever increasing degree. One of the most difficult germs is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Molecular Force Sensors

20.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Producing electricity during flight

20.09.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

20.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>