Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

’Biofumigants’ to help beat the wilt

15.09.2003


Poor farmers in developing countries could soon be using a range of ’biofumigant’ plants to help increase tropical vegetable yields.



CSIRO is part of a research team from Australia and the Philippines which has found that brassica species such as radish, mustard or broccoli can be used to help reduce yield losses from Bacterial Wilt - the major pathogen of vegetables in tropical farming.

"Brassicas contain compounds that suppress pests and pathogens, principally isothiocyanates (ITCs)," says CSIRO Plant Industry researcher, Dr John Kirkegaard.


"When ITCs are released by manuring, soil-borne pests and pathogens are suppressed and yields of solanaceous vegetables such as potatoes, tomatoes and eggplants can be increased by up to 40 per cent. The effect is known as ’biofumigation’."

The project has already evaluated brassica species and management techniques with the aim of maximising the biofumigant effect. Current field trials in the Philippines and in North Queensland are examining ways of making biofumigation practical and effective for developing countries.

Using brassicas to manage soil-borne pests is not new - there are many previous reports of disease suppression - but new insights and techniques to measure the processes involved in the release of chemicals in soil has provided opportunities to enhance the reliability of the effect.

"The project builds on that research and is making it practical for small-scale farmers around the world," Dr Kirkegaard says.

"There are economic and social benefits for small-scale farmers, as improved crop yields lead to increased incomes. There are also a range of environmental and health benefits, as a result of reduced reliance on toxic fumigants and synthetic pesticides.

"The next stage of the project seeks farmer involvement to integrate biofumigation into the cropping system, using farming networks throughout South-East Asia and the Pacific."

The team includes researchers from CSIRO Plant Industry, the Queensland Department of Primary Industry and the Philippines National Crop Protection Centre. The project is funded by the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR).

More information
Dr John Kirkegaard, CSIRO Plant Industry, 02 6246 5095
Email: john.kirkegaard@csiro.au

Bill Stephens | CSIRO
Further information:
http://www.csiro.au/index.asp?type=mediaRelease&id=Prbiofumigants

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht How much soil goes down the drain -- New data on soil lost due to water
18.12.2017 | European Commission Joint Research Centre

nachricht Cascading use is also beneficial for wood
11.12.2017 | Technische Universität München

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Error-free into the Quantum Computer Age

A study carried out by an international team of researchers and published in the journal Physical Review X shows that ion-trap technologies available today are suitable for building large-scale quantum computers. The scientists introduce trapped-ion quantum error correction protocols that detect and correct processing errors.

In order to reach their full potential, today’s quantum computer prototypes have to meet specific criteria: First, they have to be made bigger, which means...

Im Focus: Search for planets with Carmenes successful

German and Spanish researchers plan, build and use modern spectrograph

Since 2016, German and Spanish researchers, among them scientists from the University of Göttingen, have been hunting for exoplanets with the “Carmenes”...

Im Focus: First-of-its-kind chemical oscillator offers new level of molecular control

DNA molecules that follow specific instructions could offer more precise molecular control of synthetic chemical systems, a discovery that opens the door for engineers to create molecular machines with new and complex behaviors.

Researchers have created chemical amplifiers and a chemical oscillator using a systematic method that has the potential to embed sophisticated circuit...

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

The body's street sweepers

18.12.2017 | Life Sciences

Fast flowing heat in layered material heterostructures

18.12.2017 | Materials Sciences

Life on the edge prepares plants for climate change

18.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>