Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researchers develop faster, more accurate test for mad cow disease

08.09.2003


As U.S. consumers seek reassurance that their hamburgers and steaks are free of deadly mad cow disease, researchers at the University of California-San Francisco say they may have found a promising solution. They’ve developed a faster, more reliable test for identifying the disease, possibly even in living cows. Current tests can only detect the disease after the cow dies.



The test was described today at the 226th national meeting of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.

Critics argue that the standard immunoassay tests used to identify the infectious prion proteins that cause mad cow disease are inadequate for large scale screening of cattle. The tests can produce false readings and may take a week to yield results. A better test is needed, they say.


The new test, which has already undergone animal studies, seems to fit the bill. Called the conformation-dependent immunoassay (CDI), it can detect prion proteins with 100 percent accuracy at much smaller levels than conventional tests and only takes about five hours to produce results, according to the UCSF researchers.

Like conventional tests, the new test is designed for detecting prions in the brain tissue of cows only upon autopsy. Unlike other tests, however, the new test also shows promise for detecting the proteins in muscle tissue and even blood while the animal is still alive. If so, it could be used to identify precisely which animals are infected before they show symptoms and could help end the current practice of slaughtering whole herds, the scientists say.

"This represents a new generation of prion tests," says project leader Dr. Jiri G. Safar, M.D., an associate adjunct professor at UCSF. "It is the most promising test to date for accurately detecting prion proteins," says Safar, a member of the school’s Institute of Neurodegenerative Diseases.

He says the test has been used in a field trial to check for signs of the disease in the brains of 11,000 slaughtered cows in Spain, the United Kingdom and Germany. Results were compared to those from standard immunoassays performed on the same animals. There were no discrepancies between the tests, he says.

"We had a perfect score. There were no false positives and no false negatives," says Safar. "We can’t afford incorrect conclusions, and we didn’t see that in our tests."

He says that the research group plans to use the test on an even larger scale among European cattle herds within the next year, checking them for signs of the disease upon autopsy. If further tests prove successful, he hopes it will eventually be used to evaluate dead cows in this country for mad cow disease, also known as bovine spongiform encephelopathy, or BSE.

Despite the fact that the CDI test is currently being done in dead cattle, Safar says the same test could eventually be used on live animals to determine the presence of prions. In lab tests, the researcher has used the CDI test to detect prions in the muscles of living mice.

The live test could eventually be used to screen patients for the human form of mad cow disease, known as variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, which is thought to be acquired from eating infected beef. A tissue or blood test for live animals could be available in a year, says Safar. "We’re not quite there yet," he adds. "We still need to validate the effectiveness of CDI in live farm animals."

CDI has other advantages. It is automated, allowing larger numbers of animals to be screened in a short period. The test can detect up to eight different strains of prions, including those that cause scrapie in sheep and chronic wasting disease in deer.

With the recent detection of mad cow disease in neighboring Canada and the temporary ban on beef imported from that country, critics have stepped up their call for better testing. To date, there has never been a case of mad cow disease detected in the U.S. Given the flaws of current testing, however, some experts believe it could be just a matter of time.

Safar’s coauthor in this study is Dr. Stanley Prusiner, M.D., a professor of neurology and biochemistry at the university and director of its Institute for Neurodegenerative Diseases. Prusiner was the first to discover that abnormal prion proteins can cause disease, an accomplishment that won him the 1997 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

CDI technology is now licensed to InPro Biotechnology, Inc., of San Francisco, a company founded by Prusiner.

Funding for this study was provided by grants from the National Institutes of Health, the United Kingdom’s Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and private sources.


The paper on this research, ANYL 12, will be presented at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 7, at the Javits Convention Center, Room 1A01/1A02, during the "Diagnostic Assays for Prion Diseases" symposium.

Jiri G. Safar, M.D., is an associate adjunct professor at the University of California-San Francisco and a member of the school’s Institute of Neurodegenerative Disorders.

Stanley B. Prusiner, M.D., is a professor of neurology and biochemistry at UCSF and director of its Institute for Neurodegenerative Diseases. He is the recipient of the 1997 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

Michael Bernstein | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.acs.org/

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Alkaline soil, sensible sensor
03.08.2017 | American Society of Agronomy

nachricht New 3-D model predicts best planting practices for farmers
26.06.2017 | Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A Map of the Cell’s Power Station

18.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Engineering team images tiny quasicrystals as they form

18.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Researchers printed graphene-like materials with inkjet

18.08.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>