Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Early sowing offers the best protection for carrots - Carrot psyllids can destroy up to a third of a crop

22.01.2008
A doctoral dissertation produced at MTT Agrifood Research Finland reveals that early sowing of carrots is the most effective way to prevent the damage caused by carrot psyllids. If the carrot’s number one enemy gets at the seedlings at the cotyledon stage, it can rapidly destroy up to 35% of the crop.

In her dissertation, Research Scientist Anne Nissinen examined ecological methods of fighting carrot psyllids. The study was conducted in a greenhouse where the pests were allowed to feed and lay eggs on 15 different carrot varieties and a wild carrot in cages.

Nissinen examined the carrot psyllid host plant selection and the severity of the damage caused by the pest at different stages of root and shoot growth. She also assessed the possibility to utilize the push-pull strategy in management carrot psyllids.

Small, Ugly And Bearded Carrots

Carrot psyllids are a major problem in Finland’s most important carrot production regions. The psyllids overwinter in spruce trees and fly to carrot fields from early June onwards. They instantly begin to suck nutrients from carrot leaves, which quickly renders the shoots damaged.

Carrot psyllid attacks usually peak either a week before or a week after the summer solstice. In terms of the crop, it is critical that the shoots have grown enough by that time to survive the pest attack.

If the carrots have only been sown in the end of May, the pests may catch the shoots at the cotyledon stage when the carrots are most vulnerable to damage. After a pesticide treatments, the shoots may recover and look fine on the surface, but reveal small, ugly and bearded carrots at harvest, Nissinen describes.

More Research Needed Into Lure Plants

Nissinen also examined whether a particular carrot variety was more attractive to psyllids than others, which would allow it to be used as a trap crop to keep the pests from attacking the cultivated variety. Of the varieties studied, an old non-hybrid variety, which can still be found on a Swedish seed list, turned out to be the most attractive.

Nissinen believes that the use of a trap crop could be an efficient way of reducing the numbers of psyllids on carrot crops. She does, however, concede that she dare not recommend the use of trap crop in practice based on this study alone.

The effectiveness of a trap crop should always be tested in comparison to the cultivated variety in question, Nissinen concludes.

Psyllids Unfazed By “Bad Smell”

The study also included an experiment where carrot psyllids were exposed to a volatile compound: limonene. Limonene can be found both in carrots and in the psyllids’ winter host, the spruce.

A study conducted in Sweden during the last decade found that limonene repelled carrot psyllids in the field. In Nissinen’s greenhouse experiments, however, limonene failed to shoo psyllids away. neither when sprayed directly onto the carrot crop nor when released from a carrier substance.

The contradiction between the research findings may be because greenhouse conditions differ from field conditions and the psyllids are unable to carry out the change of host plant as they would in the course of their normal live cycle. Nissinen explains.

She adds that in her opinion it is important that future experiments involving potential repellents or attractants should take place in field conditions.

The dissertation of Anne Nissinen, M.Sc. (Agriculture and Forestry), is in the field of environmental science and is titled “Towards ecological control of carrot psyllid (Trioza apicalis)”. The dissertation will be reviewed on 25 January 2008 at the University of Kuopio, Finland. Nissinen’s opponent will be Doctor Robert Glinwood from the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, and Professor Jarmo Holopainen from the University of Kuopio will be acting as her supervisor.

Ulla Jauhiainen | alfa
Further information:
http://www.mtt.fi

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Energy crop production on conservation lands may not boost greenhouse gases
13.03.2017 | Penn State

nachricht How nature creates forest diversity
07.03.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>