Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Prestorage conditioning, diphenylamine improve condition of 'honeycrisp' apple

27.03.2014

Scientists determine methods for improving resistance to controlled-atmosphere-related injury

Since the introduction of 'Honeycrisp' apples in 1991, the variety has become a consumer favorite for its unusual texture and delicious flavor. Honeycrisp has increased in popularity with growers as well; Michigan, New York, and Washington boast significant numbers of 'Honeycrisp' orchards.

As the growing area dedicated to the variety has grown, the need to find better methods for improving storage performance has become more important to growers. Because 'Honeycrisp' is very sensitive to low temperatures and can be damaged by controlled-atmosphere conditions, long-term storage of the apples can be challenging.

Carolina Contreras and Randy Beaudry from the Department of Horticulture at Michigan State University and Nihad Alsmairat from the Department of Horticulture and Crop Science at the University of Jordan published a study in HortScience that revealed some important information for apple producers. "Our work was conducted in two phases," Beaudry explained.

"The first phase was designed to determine whether 'Honeycrisp' apples were susceptible to controlled-atmosphere injury, to determine the relative influence of O2 and CO2, and to identify a treatment combination that would reliably generate symptoms so that control measures could be subsequently evaluated." In the second phase, the scientists evaluated options for avoiding injury to 'Honeycrisp' during controlled-atmosphere storage. Fruit were conditioned at 3º C, 10º C, and 20º C for 5 days and then exposed to one of nine different storage treatments.

In the first experiment, 'Honeycrisp' exhibited a high sensitivity to both low oxygen and elevated CO2 levels. "We found that the controlled-atmospheres used induced injuries typical of those associated with CO2 (i.e., small brown lesions and associated lens-shaped cavities) and also larger dark brown lesions with often irregular margins," the authors said. "The extent of the injury was higher for those fruit in an atmosphere with elevated CO2 for each level of O2."

Subsequent experiments took place over 3 years, during which the researchers reproduced the controlled-atmosphere (CA) injury from the preliminary study with varied intensity. Although the researchers observed high variability between orchards and years, they found two treatments that effectively controlled the CA injury. "We found that the brown lesions in the cortex were completely suppressed by DPA application, even when the prestorage conditioning temperature was 3º C," Beaudry said. "The incidence of cavities ranged from 0.1% to 0.3% under the same DPA treatment. On the other hand, the most affected treatment was 3/3 followed by 3/0, 21/0, and 21/ 0 plus 1-MCP."

The authors noted that, while there is good progress toward determining optimal storage recommendations for 'Honeycrisp' additional studies are still warranted. "For instance, although the 7-day prestorage conditioning treatments provided some protection against the development of CA injury, shorter durations should be investigated to prevent quality loss resulting from excessive ripening, which could cause increased skin greasiness and undesirable flavor profile."

The study includes additional recommendations for handling 'Honeycrisp' in prestorage conditions.

###

The complete study and abstract are available on the ASHS HortScience electronic journal web site: http://hortsci.ashspublications.org/content/49/1/76.abstract

Founded in 1903, the American Society for Horticultural Science (ASHS) is the largest organization dedicated to advancing all facets of horticultural research, education, and application. More information at ashs.org

Michael W. Neff | EurekAlert!

Further reports about: ASHS HortScience Horticultural Science conditioning conditions injury lesions levels recommendations skin variety

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Energy crop production on conservation lands may not boost greenhouse gases
13.03.2017 | Penn State

nachricht How nature creates forest diversity
07.03.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA examines Peru's deadly rainfall

24.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

What does congenital Zika syndrome look like?

24.03.2017 | Health and Medicine

Steep rise of the Bernese Alps

24.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>