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Best way to pour champagne? 'Down the side' wins first scientific test

12.08.2010
In a study that may settle a long-standing disagreement over the best way to pour a glass of champagne, scientists in France are reporting that pouring bubbly in an angled, down-the-side way is best for preserving its taste and fizz.

The study also reports the first scientific evidence confirming the importance of chilling champagne before serving to enhance its taste, the scientists say. Their report appears in ACS' bi-weekly Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Gérard Liger-Belair and colleagues note that tiny bubbles are the essence of fine champagnes and sparkling wines. Past studies indicate that the bubbles — formed during the release of large amounts of dissolved carbon dioxide gas — help transfer the taste, aroma, and mouth-feel of champagne. Scientists long have suspected that the act of pouring a glass of bubbly could have a big impact on gas levels in champagne and its quality. Until now, however, no scientific study had been done.

The scientists studied carbon dioxide loss in champagne using two different pouring methods. One involved pouring champagne straight down the middle of a glass. The other involved pouring champagne down the side of an angled glass. They found that pouring champagne down the side preserved up to twice as much carbon dioxide in champagne than pouring down the middle — probably because the angled method was gentler. They also showed that cooler champagne temperatures (ideally, 39 degrees Fahrenheit) help reduce carbon dioxide loss.

ARTICLE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE "On the Losses of Dissolved CO2 during Champagne Serving"

DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ARTICLE http://pubs.acs.org/stoken/presspac/presspac/full/10.1021/jf101239w

CONTACT:
Gérard Liger-Belair, Ph.D.
University of Reims
Reims, France
Phone: 333 26 91 86 14
Fax: 333-26-91-33-40
Email: Gerard.liger-belair@univ-reims.fr

Michael Bernstein | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.acs.org

Further reports about: carbon dioxide champagnes sparkling wines

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