Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

After Landslides, Soil Carbon Storage Recovers Rapidly

25.11.2009
Soils comprise the largest non-marine carbon pool, exceeding that of the atmosphere and terrestrial biosphere combined. The high carbon storage potential of forest soils and the large area of forested lands in the United States (28% of U.S. land area) makes forest soil development a particularly important carbon sink.

Because most forested areas are in mountainous regions, 40% of U.S. forests are in landslide hazard areas. Thus, the interaction between soil development and mass wasting is critical to understanding the dynamics of terrestrial carbon storage.

In a study funded by the U.C. Kearney Foundation for Soil Science, scientists at the University of California, Riverside, have investigated carbon and nitrogen accumulation in soils formed on debris flows in a coniferous forest in southern California. Soil formation was studied using a space-for-time substitution, in which debris flows of various ages were used to approximate soil formation over time. Results from the study were published in the September-October issue of the Soil Science Society of America Journal.

Soil pits were excavated on 10 debris flows of varying ages and the soils were sampled by horizon for carbon and nitrogen analysis. The bulk density of the soil and volume of rock fragments were also measured, which was necessary to calculate the carbon and nitrogen storage per unit of land area. Expressing storage on a land area basis makes it possible to relate spatial data on forest cover and age structure to carbon and nitrogen cycling in soils.

Strong relationships were observed between soil age and carbon and nitrogen storage, especially in the organic horizons. Extrapolation of the carbon accumulation trend suggests that the carbon storage at the site will approach values typical for the ecosystem type in as little as 500 years.

“At this site we see that the recurrence interval between debris flows is less than the time required for stabilization of the soil carbon and nitrogen pools, effectively holding the soils within the narrow window where carbon and nitrogen accumulation are most rapid” said Judith Turk, co-author of the study. “However, the net impact of such debris flows on the carbon cycle depends significantly on the decomposition rate of organic matter in soils that they bury.”

Ongoing research at the University of California, Riverside, aims to determine the influence of debris flows on carbon storage in the buried soils. Collaborators at the University of Alberta, led by Sylvie Quideau, Prof. of Soil Biogeochemistry, are studying the changes in microbial communities with soil age in the debris flows.

The full article is available for no charge for 30 days following the date of this summary. View the abstract at http://soil.scijournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/73/5/1504.

Soil Science Society of America Journal, http://soil.scijournals.org, is a peer-reviewed international journal published six times a year by the Soil Science Society of America. Its contents focus on research relating to physics; chemistry; biology and biochemistry; fertility and plant nutrition; genesis, morphology, and classification; water management and conservation; forest, range, and wildland soils; nutrient management and soil and plant analysis; mineralogy; and wetland soils.

The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) is a progressive, international scientific society that fosters the transfer of knowledge and practices to sustain global soils. Based in Madison, WI, and founded in 1936, SSSA is the professional home for 6,000+ members dedicated to advancing the field of soil science. It provides information about soils in relation to crop production, environmental quality, ecosystem sustainability, bioremediation, waste management, recycling, and wise land use.

SSSA supports its members by providing quality research-based publications, educational programs, certifications, and science policy initiatives via a Washington, DC, office. For more information, visit www.soils.org.

SSSA is the founding sponsor of an approximately 5,000-square foot exhibition, Dig It! The Secrets of Soil, which opened July 19, 2008 at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC

Sara Uttech | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.soils.org

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Six-legged livestock -- sustainable food production
11.05.2017 | Faculty of Science - University of Copenhagen

nachricht Elephant Herpes: Super-Shedders Endanger Young Animals
04.05.2017 | Universität Zürich

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Physicists discover mechanism behind granular capillary effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Measured for the first time: Direction of light waves changed by quantum effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>