Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Good news for pigs

02.10.2008
There are currently two methods for artificial insemination: bull semen can be frozen to a temperature of -172 °C and may be stored indefinitely.

However, pig semen must be diluted and stored liquid, and the storage capacity is only a few days. The window of opportunity for insemination is also limited. Striking the period when the sow is receptive is difficult and farmers need to inspect the animals regularly.

Storage
Achieving simpler insemination routines has therefore been an objective for Geno and Norsvin, the two national organisations that operate systematic rearing of cattle, horses and pigs.

“The timeframe from when a sperm dose for pigs is extracted until it must be utilised is five days,” says reproduction research scientist Ann Helen Gaustad at Norsvin. “Extending this by one to two days would be extremely significant.”

The two organisations contacted SINTEF in 2003 and with the assistance of funding from the Research Council of Norway a research project was commenced. Research scientists wanted to influence sperm cells to become capable of fertilising over a longer period. In 2008, the status is that the research scientists have developed a technique that moulds the sperm cells into an alginate gel. The cells can then be stored until the gel is inseminated into the animal.

“We have been trying to confirm a hypothesis that restricted tail movements of sperm cells, as is the case when they are in the animal’s testicles, provides longer lasting qualities,” says Geir Klinkenberg at SINTEF. “We achieve the restrictions by using the gel and the results to date are good. By achieving longer storage ability, it prolongs the lifespan of the sperm population in the uterus.”

High values
Insemination sperm for pigs is currently sent throughout Norway from a central plant in Hamar. Norsvin produces up to 3000 doses daily.

“This is production on an industrial scale where the sperm can be utilised on a large number of animals, and where each sperm and each piglet represents high values,” says Klinkenberg.

The next step will take place in the spring with insemination trials on larger animals. Around 1000 animals will be inseminated using the new method to see if better results are achieved than with today’s conventional methods.

“This is a completely new and revolutionary approach where the focus has been on controlling the processes that occur both before and after the insemination,” says Geno Research & Development Manager Elisabeth Kommisrud.

Aase Dragland | alfa
Further information:
http://www.sintef.com

Further reports about: SINTEF Uterus artificial insemination bull semen pigs sperm cells sperm population

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Researchers discover a new link to fight billion-dollar threat to soybean production
14.02.2017 | University of Missouri-Columbia

nachricht Important to maintain a diversity of habitats in the sea
14.02.2017 | University of Gothenburg

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Microhotplates for a smart gas sensor

22.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Scientists unlock ability to generate new sensory hair cells

22.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Prediction: More gas-giants will be found orbiting Sun-like stars

22.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>