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Global Leader in Salmonid Production Teams Up with UM’s Globally Recognized Aquaculture Program

09.03.2009
The University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science has entered into an agreement with Seattle-based Troutlodge Marine to cooperate on the research and commercialization of cobia and other tropical marine fish species. The agreement calls for the joint training of students and professionals, cooperative research, and the sharing of knowledge and resources.

Aquaculture is the fastest growing sector in global food production. It currently contributes 50% of all seafood available for human consumption worldwide. The program at the University of Miami has played a major role in supporting the development of the industry in the Americas and the Caribbean.

During the last decade, the Aquaculture Program at UM has focused on developing technologies for sustainable aquaculture. The main focus areas include: hatchery technology, fishmeal use in aquaculture, environmental pollution and fish health. Using science-based, verifiable research, the program is successfully identifying and developing new opportunities in marine aquaculture.

“Partially funded by NOAA, we have been able to establish the most advanced hatchery technology for cobia,” said Dr. Daniel Benetti, professor and director of the UM Aquaculture Program. “We have successfully carried out the research required to develop this technology, and have sustainably produced large numbers of cobia eggs, larvae and fingerlings. Now it is time for the private sector to take this technology to the next level and commercialize it.”

With the agreement with Troutlodge now in place, UM’s Aquaculture Program can concentrate on what it does best – pioneering research on species suitable for aquaculture. The hatchery will next begin to focus on tuna, goggle-eye (bait fish), snapper and Seriola (jacks and pompanos).

Jim Parsons, the director of Troutlodge’s marine division is enthusiastic about the agreement. “To be able to work with an organization like UM’s Rosenstiel School is a dream come true. We are excited by the potential of marine fish aquaculture. The strength of our company in genetics and brood stock management has supported the success of salmonid producers throughout the world, and we firmly believe that by combining similar efforts in emerging marine fish species with the cutting edge work of the University of Miami, we will meet with equal success.”

The UM Aquaculture Program has worked with Snapperfarm/Open Blue Sea Farms for the last ten years in demonstrating the technological, environmental and economical feasibility of developing open ocean aquafarms. Open Blue Sea Farms will continue to be a lead partner and customer of this new initiative.

Troutlodge Marine is the saltwater division of Troutlodge Inc. Troutlodge was founded in 1945 and has been a key egg supplier to the salmonid industry for over 50 years. It has upland facilities in Washington State, Oregon, Chile and the Isle of Man, and ships salmonid eggs into more than 50 countries. Its marine division has a facility in Kona, Hawaii where it is commercializing black cod and moi, and a newly acquired facility in Vero Beach, Fla., which produces cobia and pompano eggs and fingerlings.

Founded in the 1940’s, the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science has grown into one of the world’s premier marine and atmospheric research institutions. Offering dynamic interdisciplinary academics, the Rosenstiel School is dedicated to helping communities to better understand the planet, participating in the establishment of environmental policies, and aiding in the improvement of society and quality of life.

Media Contacts:
Barbra Gonzalez
UM Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
305.421.4704
barbgo@rsmas.miami.edu
Marie Guma-Diaz
UM Media Relations Office
305.284.1601
m.gumadiaz@umiami.edu

Barbra Gonzalez | RSMAS MIAMI
Further information:
http://www.rsmas.miami.edu
http://www.troutlodge.com

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