Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Forest pests accumulating despite regulations

Nonindigenous insects and pathogens, including many that cause serious damage, have established in forests in the United States with regularity over 15 decades

Nonindigenous insects and pathogens continue to become established in US forests with regularity despite regulations intended to prevent this, according to a study published in the December 2010 issue of BioScience.

The study, by a team led by Juliann E. Aukema of the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis in Santa Barbara, California, found that nonindigenous insects are being newly detected in US forests at a rate of about 2.5 per year, and high-impact insects and pathogens that cause significant effects in forests, including tree death, are being newly detected every 2 to 2.5 years. The rate of detection of harmful forest invaders seems to have increased in the past two decades.

Nonindigenous insects and pathogens have profound effects on US forests and inflict high costs on society, including direct market losses to the nursery and timber industries, the costs of control and eradication, and the loss of nonmarket benefits, including wildlife habitat and carbon sequestration. In the case of one notorious example, the emerald ash borer, the cost to municipalities over the next 10 years is estimated to be close to $10 billion for landscape tree treatment or removal. This pest threatens native ash species across North America.

The researchers analyzed 455 insect species, of which 62 were considered high-impact, to arrive at their conclusions. Sap-feeding insects dominated the list of non-indigenous insects, especially aphids, adelgids, and scale insects. New nonindigenous sap feeders and foliage feeders have historically been detected more frequently than insects that bore into phloem or wood, the researchers found, although wood- and phloem-borers have increased markedly in recent decades.

Increased trade and travel probably explain why invaders keep arriving despite regulatory efforts, Aukema and her coauthors believe. They advocate strengthening broad-based efforts to prevent arrivals of nonindigenous organisms, because such efforts are much more effective than attempts to eradicate arrivals that have become established. But enhanced efforts to detect newly arrived forest insects could also help, the researchers maintain.

By noon EST on 6 December 2010 and until early January, the full text of the article will be available for free download through the copy of this press release available at

BioScience, published 11 times per year, is the journal of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS). BioScience publishes commentary and peer-reviewed articles covering a wide range of biological fields, with a focus on "Organisms from Molecules to the Environment." The journal has been published since 1964. AIBS is an umbrella organization for professional scientific societies and organizations that are involved with biology. It represents some 200 member societies and organizations with a combined membership of about 250,000.

The complete list of peer-reviewed articles in the December 2010 issue of BioScience is as follows:

Self-organization, Natural Selection, and Evolution: Cellular Hardware and Genetic Software.

Brian R. Johnson and Sheung Kwan Lam

Historical Accumulation of Nonindigenous Forest Pests in the Continental United States.

Juliann E. Aukema, Deborah G. McCullough, Betsy Von Holle, Andrew M. Liebhold, Kerry Britton, and Susan J. Frankel

Ecohydrology of Terrestrial Ecosystems.
Paolo D'Odorico, Francesco Laio, Amilcare Porporato, Luca Ridolfi, Andrea Rinaldo, and Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe
The River Discontinuum: Applying Beaver (Castor canadensis) Modifications to Baseline Conditions for Restoration of Forested Headwaters.

Denise Burchsted, Melinda Daniels, Robert Thorson, and Jason Vokoun

Empowering 21st Century Biology.
Gene A. Robinson and colleagues
Evolution of Collaboration within the US Long Term Ecological Research Network.
Jeffrey C. Johnson, Robert R. Christian, James W. Brunt, Caleb R. Hickman, and Robert B. Waide
Are Gray Wolves Endangered in the Northern Rocky Mountains? A Role for Social Science in Listing Determinations.

Jeremy T. Bruskotter, Eric Toman, Sherry A. Enzler, and Robert H. Schmidt

Tim Beardsley | EurekAlert!
Further information:

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Earlier flowering of modern winter wheat cultivars
20.03.2018 | Georg-August-Universität Göttingen

nachricht Algorithm could streamline harvesting of hand-picked crops
13.03.2018 | University of Illinois College of Engineering

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Alliance „OLED Licht Forum“ – Key partner for OLED lighting solutions

Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP, provider of research and development services for OLED lighting solutions, announces the founding of the “OLED Licht Forum” and presents latest OLED design and lighting solutions during light+building, from March 18th – 23rd, 2018 in Frankfurt a.M./Germany, at booth no. F91 in Hall 4.0.

They are united in their passion for OLED (organic light emitting diodes) lighting with all of its unique facets and application possibilities. Thus experts in...

Im Focus: Mars' oceans formed early, possibly aided by massive volcanic eruptions

Oceans formed before Tharsis and evolved together, shaping climate history of Mars

A new scenario seeking to explain how Mars' putative oceans came and went over the last 4 billion years implies that the oceans formed several hundred million...

Im Focus: Tiny implants for cells are functional in vivo

For the first time, an interdisciplinary team from the University of Basel has succeeded in integrating artificial organelles into the cells of live zebrafish embryos. This innovative approach using artificial organelles as cellular implants offers new potential in treating a range of diseases, as the authors report in an article published in Nature Communications.

In the cells of higher organisms, organelles such as the nucleus or mitochondria perform a range of complex functions necessary for life. In the networks of...

Im Focus: Locomotion control with photopigments

Researchers from Göttingen University discover additional function of opsins

Animal photoreceptors capture light with photopigments. Researchers from the University of Göttingen have now discovered that these photopigments fulfill an...

Im Focus: Surveying the Arctic: Tracking down carbon particles

Researchers embark on aerial campaign over Northeast Greenland

On 15 March, the AWI research aeroplane Polar 5 will depart for Greenland. Concentrating on the furthest northeast region of the island, an international team...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Industry & Economy
Event News

Virtual reality conference comes to Reutlingen

19.03.2018 | Event News

Ultrafast Wireless and Chip Design at the DATE Conference in Dresden

16.03.2018 | Event News

International Tinnitus Conference of the Tinnitus Research Initiative in Regensburg

13.03.2018 | Event News

Latest News

New 4-D printer could reshape the world we live in

21.03.2018 | Life Sciences

Alliance „OLED Licht Forum“ – Key partner for OLED lighting solutions

21.03.2018 | Trade Fair News

Physicists made crystal lattice from polaritons

20.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>