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Divot Resistance in Golf Course Turfgrass

11.08.2011
Researchers hit the links to determine the divot resistance of several types of turfgrass

Golf courses, known for their calm scenic views and precise grass patterns, take daily abuse. Divots created by golf strokes are a common occurrence, and can be a costly problem for golf course maintenance operations. Although previous research has identified differences in divot recovery across species of bermudagrass and zoysiagrass, little is known about divot resistance.

Scientists at Purdue University and the University of Arkansas evaluated 12 cultivars of bermudagrass and zoysiagrass in a field experiment conducted in Fayetteville, Arkansas. Two golfers each hit three golf balls on each plot. The divots created by their shots were rated visually for divot type and severity, and the volume of displaced soil was measured.

The primary objective of this experiment was to quantify the divot resistance for various turfgrass cultivars. Researchers also compared evaluation methods for quantifying divot resistance. This study was published in the July/August 2011 issue of Crop Science.

‘Riviera’ bermudagrass allowed the largest volume per divot, while the smallest divots were observed with ‘Cavalier’, ‘Diamond’, and ‘Zorro’ zoysiagrass. The four methods used to evaluate divot resistance provided similar findings among the different grass cultivars and species tested.

“Due to the ease and speed as well as lower measurement variability of evaluating divot resistance, a visual rating for divot severity or a Turfgrass Shear Tester are recommended for future work in divot resistance,” explained Jon Trappe, a Purdue professor and the author of this study.

The results from this study demonstrate the differences and similarities in divot resistance that exist among various grass cultivars. Cultivars that are more resistant to divoting can help reduce maintenance inputs and costs. The research also demonstrates the need for evaluating the combination of resistance and recovery of divoting, as some grass cultivars have both improved resistance and recovery.

This research was partially funded by the Arkansas Turfgrass Association and the Golf Course Superintendents Association of Arkansas.

The full article is available for no charge for 30 days following the date of this summary. View the abstract at https://www.crops.org/publications/cs/articles/51/4/1793.

Crop Science is the flagship journal of the Crop Science Society of America. Original research is peer-reviewed and published in this highly cited journal. It also contains invited review and interpretation articles and perspectives that offer insight and commentary on recent advances in crop science. For more information, visit www.crops.org/publications/cs

The Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), founded in 1955, is an international scientific society comprised of 6,000+ members with its headquarters in Madison, WI. Members advance the discipline of crop science by acquiring and disseminating information about crop breeding and genetics; crop physiology; crop ecology, management, and quality; seed physiology, production, and technology; turfgrass science; forage and grazinglands; genomics, molecular genetics, and biotechnology; and biomedical and enhanced plants.

CSSA fosters the transfer of knowledge through an array of programs and services, including publications, meetings, career services, and science policy initiatives.

Sara Uttech | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.crops.org

Further reports about: Arkansas crop crop science molecular genetic turfgrass

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