Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Diversity in a monoculture

15.04.2015

Functional differences within a species ensure its survival and improve the productivity of the whole ecosystem. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, demonstrated in field experiments with Nicotiana attenuata plants that it is sufficient to alter the expression of certain defense genes in individual plants to protect the whole population and to alter the diversity of the ecosystem as a whole.

Modern, machine-friendly agriculture is dominated by monocultures. One single cultivar – one genotype of a crop species – is cultivated on large areas.


Experimental setup with plants whose defense genes were expressed differently.

Meredith Schuman / Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology / eLife

Favored cultivars are optimized for high yields and often contain only few natural plant defense compounds. Unfortunately, these extensive monocultures of identical plants can become an ecological wasteland and cause permanent damage to the ecosystem, especially when combined with blanket application of fertilizer and pesticides.

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, demonstrated in field experiments with Nicotiana attenuata plants that it is sufficient to alter the expression of certain defense genes in individual plants to protect the whole population and to alter the diversity of the ecosystem as a whole. (eLife, April 2015)

The term biodiversity is often used as a synonym for species diversity. However, this is not entirely correct, because apart from the diversity of different plant and animal species the term also includes variations within the same species. How well a plant develops, how it adapts to its environment or copes with climatic conditions and natural enemies, depends on its genes.

What a particular gene does in a plant, on the other hand, depends on where and how the plant lives: isolated, in dense populations, in the center or the edge of a population, in what environment. If we bear in mind that plants may have about 30,000 genes, which can be expressed quite differently depending on time and location or other varying conditions, it becomes clear that an uncountable number of combinations is possible just as a result of variable gene expression, even within one single species.

The project group “Ecological functions of plant secondary metabolites” headed by Meredith Schuman, which is associated with the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig, is studying the diversity of these combinations in functionally different, but genetically near-identical plants. The researchers use the tobacco plant Nicotiana attenuata. This wild tobacco species, also called coyote tobacco, employs surprisingly versatile and sophisticated defense mechanisms to fend off herbivores. Large parts of its genome have already been sequenced.

For their experiments Meredith Schuman and her colleagues used tobacco plants which had been altered in the expression of certain defense genes, namely LOX2, LOX3 and TPS10. These three genes mediate important direct (LOX3) and indirect defenses (LOX2, LOX3, and TPS10). By silencing or over-expressing these genes in different combinations the scientists produced plants that were genetically identical except for the manipulation of those specific genes, and differed considerably with regard to an important ecological function: the ability to defend themselves.

Indirect defenses of tobacco plants include volatiles which function as messenger molecules by informing predators about the presence of herbivores. Predators can then find their prey more easily and plants can get rid of their enemies. These odor molecules can travel long distances, which is why the whole neighborhood might benefit from the attracted predators, even if only one single plant produces the volatiles. “Variations in single plant genes can have large effects for whole plant populations when those genes themselves have important ecological functions”, Meredith Schuman explains.

Together with wild-type tobacco plants, plants which had been altered in the expression of the three defense genes were planted out in small populations in their natural habitat in the Great Basin Desert in Utah, USA, where they were monitored over a period of time. The researchers found that the populations of herbivores and their natural enemies changed in the neighborhood and on plants, depending on the combination of functionally diverse plants. However, changes were often observed in whole populations, not on individual plants.

One of the observations the scientists made came as a real surprise: In the vicinity of TPS10-expressing plants, which produce the volatile trans-α-bergamotene (TAB) that attracts predators, infestation of plants by the stem-boring weevil Trichobaris mucorea – whose larvae live hidden from predators inside stems – more than doubled. “This result shows how these info molecules can be double-edged swords”, says Ian Baldwin, director of the Department of Molecular Ecology and a pioneer of ecological genetics. “They benefit plants when they attract predators, but they are also a detriment when the odor brings herbivores like the weevil on the scene. This is why a plant only releases the chemical cry for help when it is attacked by the herbivore it wants to have killed”.

According to the scientists, functional diversity based on variation in gene expression can be compared to species diversity in certain habitats as far as ecosystem services are concerned. “Functional diversity means nothing else than the ability of various individuals of one species to perform different ecological tasks. Having everyone doing the same thing is rarely the best way for a species to maximize its ability to produce successful grandchildren, or in other words, it is Darwinian fitness”, explains Ian Baldwin.

The researchers even go one step further by indicating that their findings can be utilized in modern agriculture. “Varying the expression of just a few genes in just a few individuals can have large protective effects for the whole field”, says Meredith Schuman. “We hereby suggest an economically tenable way to recover some of the lost benefits of biodiversity for the vast expanses of land which have already been converted from natural, biodiverse habitats into agricultural monocultures”.

According to estimates of the United Nations, the world’s current population of over 7.2 billion people will have reached 10 billion by the end of the century, and all these people need to be fed. The demand for food will increase constantly with the growing population. Basic knowledge derived from research in molecular plant ecology may contribute to a more sustainable use of agricultural land and to a better adaptation of crops to the given natural environments. [AO]

Original Publication:
Schuman, M. C., Allmann, S., Baldwin, I. T. (2015). Plant defense phenotypes determine the consequences of volatile emission for individuals and neighbors. eLife, 4, e04490, doi: doi:10.7554/elife/04490
http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/elife/04490

Further Information:
Ian T. Baldwin, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Hans-Knöll-Str. 8, 07743 Jena, Germany, +49 3641 57-1101, E-Mail baldwin@ice.mpg.de
Meredith C. Schuman, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Hans-Knöll-Str. 8, 07743 Jena, Germany, +49 3641 57-1116, E-Mail mschuman@ice.mpg.de

Contact and Picture Requests:
Angela Overmeyer M.A., Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Hans-Knöll-Str. 8, 07743 Jena, Germany, +49 3641 57-2110, E-Mail overmeyer@ice.mpg.de

Download of high resolution images via http://www.ice.mpg.de/ext/735.html

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.ice.mpg.de/ext/molecular-ecology.html (Department of Molecular Ecology)

Angela Overmeyer | Max-Planck-Institut für chemische Ökologie

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Climate change, population growth may lead to open ocean aquaculture
05.10.2017 | Oregon State University

nachricht New machine evaluates soybean at harvest for quality
04.10.2017 | University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Electrode materials from the microwave oven

19.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

New material for digital memories of the future

19.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

Physics boosts artificial intelligence methods

19.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>