Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Cutting-edge science creating solutions for African agriculture

21.02.2012
We are frequently reminded of the complex challenges Africa faces when it comes to feeding its population, particularly in the sub-Saharan region.

Dealing with hunger and famine ¨C let alone broader food security issues ¨C is paramount and needs a global effort. Overcoming these challenges in the longer term is equally important, but more complex, and requires increased efforts in research and development.

A re-invigorated effort to boost African science know-how to solve Africa's challenges has begun. With international funding, the Biosciences eastern and central Africa Hub (BecA-ILRI Hub) based in Nairobi, Kenya and managed by the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) is enabling African and international scientists to partner on a wide range of new and exciting research programs. Most of these research programs focus on both animal and crop health for better productivity under challenges including diseases and abiotic stresses.

With help from its global investors ¨C the Australian Government's Agency for International Development (AusAID), CSIRO - Australia's national science agency, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Syngenta Foundation for Sustainable Agriculture and the Swedish Ministry for Foreign Affairs (through the Swedish International Cooperation Development Agency) ¨C the BecA-ILRI Hub has set up a unique capacity building fund, referred to as the Africa Biosciences Challenge Fund (ABCF) for African scientists. The ABCF enables African scientists from across Africa to access the world-class research facilities and scientific support skills to progress their research.

"The BecA-ILRI Hub is about helping Africans deal with Africa's underlying issues with food production, nutrition and animal health ¨C by investing in our scientists and students" says Dr Segenet Kelemu, Director of the BecA-ILRI Hub.

"Unless we address these fundamental issues by working with farmers on the ground in Africa and boost the science and technology capacity of our African research through our scientific institutions and initiatives like the ABCF, we'll never solve the crises that are happening across Africa" adds Dr Kelemu.

"So many of our talented African scientists leave Africa to progress their careers and don't come back to Africa, finding opportunities elsewhere in the world. This is a big problem for Africa" says Dr Appolinaire Djikeng, Senior Scientist and Technology Manager at the BecA-ILRI Hub.

Dr Djikeng adds "these scientists are some of Africa's best, working on extremely important issues directly related to food security and income generation in the region. The ABCF makes it possible to solve these regional issues, here in Africa." Projects include investigations of the spread of African swine fever, breeding improved varieties of orphan crops like Enset (commonly called 'false banana'), and conserving and better using Africa's native livestock diversity, such as its indigenous chickens. These projects are being led by scientists from national programs and universities in sub©Saharan Africa.

"There's a massive opportunity in Africa to be able to increase yields and increase farmers' access to infrastructure and markets ¨C to enable a transition out of poverty and hunger. That's what the BecA-ILRI Hub is doing along with the support from its partners ¨C and it's very exciting" says Dr Kelemu.

About the BecA-ILRI Hub:

The BecA©ILRI Hub is a world©class agricultural research and biosciences facility managed by ILRI in Nairobi, Kenya. It provides support to African and international scientists conducting research on African agricultural challenges and acts as a focal point for learning, interaction and strategic research ¨C enabling collaborations in the scientific community to benefit African farmers and markets within the region. The Hub was established as part of an African Union/New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD) African Biosciences Initiative, which employs modern biotechnology to improve agriculture and agricultural livelihoods in eastern and central Africa. http://hub.africabiosciences.org/about-abcf/
About ILRI:

ILRI (www.ilri.org) works with partners worldwide to enhance livestock pathways out of poverty, principally in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. The products of these research partnerships help poor people keep their farm animals alive and productive, increase and sustain their livestock and farm productivity, find profitable markets for their animal products and reduce their risk to livestock-related diseases. ILRI has its headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya. ILRI belongs to the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (www.cgiar.org), which works to reduce hunger, disease, poverty and environmental degradation in developing countries by generating, sharing and spreading relevant agricultural knowledge, technologies and policies.
Media information:

Dr Appolinaire Djikeng is speaking on 19th February at the AAAS Meeting in Vancouver, Canada and is available for interview.

Media contact and images: Larelle McMillan on +254 706 141 669 or at Larelle.mcmillan@csiro.au

Larelle McMillan | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.csiro.au

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht New 3-D model predicts best planting practices for farmers
26.06.2017 | Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

nachricht Fighting a destructive crop disease with mathematics
21.06.2017 | University of Cambridge

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Making Waves

Computer scientists use wave packet theory to develop realistic, detailed water wave simulations in real time. Their results will be presented at this year’s SIGGRAPH conference.

Think about the last time you were at a lake, river, or the ocean. Remember the ripples of the water, the waves crashing against the rocks, the wake following...

Im Focus: Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity

An international team of scientists has proposed a new multi-disciplinary approach in which an array of new technologies will allow us to map biodiversity and the risks that wildlife is facing at the scale of whole landscapes. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. This international research is led by the Kunming Institute of Zoology from China, University of East Anglia, University of Leicester and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research.

Using a combination of satellite and ground data, the team proposes that it is now possible to map biodiversity with an accuracy that has not been previously...

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Nanostructures taste the rainbow

29.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New technique unveils 'matrix' inside tissues and tumors

29.06.2017 | Life Sciences

Cystic fibrosis alters the structure of mucus in airways

29.06.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>