Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

China's Food Economy Benefits Small, Poor Farmers

09.01.2009
One of the most significant changes in China’s agricultural economy over the past fifteen years has been the rise of horticulture. During this same time period, modern supply chains have also emerged.

A new study in the Review of Agricultural Economics reveals that the recent changes in China ’s food economy have contributed to an improvement in poverty reduction and betterment of small farmers. However, there exists a great challenge to ensure delivery of a safe product.

Jikun Huang, Yunhua Wu, Huayong Zhi, and Scott Rozelle used a dataset that they collected themselves in 2007 of a representative sample of fruit farmers in Shandong province to describe the emergence of the production and marketing structures. The researchers explored who is entering the different types of market channels and whether these channels guarantee food safety.

Results show that small and poor farms are able to sell into traditional marketing channels. There is no evidence that poor households are getting less access to horticultural markets. To the extent that modern chains have penetrated into rural China, there exist no distinguishable differences in terms of size or wealth level.

However, ensuring the safety of China ’s apples and grapes is a challenging task. According to their survey, there are almost no contractual relationships between buyers and producers. Almost all transaction are in cash and done on a spot-market basis. Because of this, it would be difficult for any shipment of fresh or processed fruit that originated from the farms to be tracked back to the farm. After selling their output into the market, farmers in China ’s horticulture economy are free from all accountability.

“ China ’s challenge is great,” the authors conclude. “On the one hand, it wants to keep its market accessible to small, poor farmers. However, when a market is dominated by traders in traditional marketing channels, there is a big challenge in meeting the growing demand for food safety.” Recent events inside China have shown that indeed this is an area that requires policy action. In the past several months China ’s government has begun to focus its efforts on building the institutions that are needed to modernize the food system from farm to consumer.

This study is published in the Review of Agricultural Economics. Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article may contact journalnews@bos.blackwellpublishing.net.

Scott Rozelle is affiliated with Stanford University and can be reached for questions at rozelle@stanford.edu.

The Review of Agricultural Economics is published jointly by the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association, the Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, and the Western Agricultural Economics Association. The purpose of the Review is to provide a scholarly journal for research findings on real world issues relevant to various areas of agricultural, food, and natural resource economics, broadly defined. Published articles are expected to be of interest to applied economists working in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors, both domestically and internationally.

Amy Molnar | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.wiley.com
http://www.wiley.com/bw/press/pressitem.asp?ref=2017

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Cascading use is also beneficial for wood
11.12.2017 | Technische Universität München

nachricht The future of crop engineering
08.12.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Biochemie

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New type of smart windows use liquid to switch from clear to reflective

14.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

BigH1 -- The key histone for male fertility

14.12.2017 | Life Sciences

Guardians of the Gate

14.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>