Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

UW's Newly Named 'Lamborghini Lab' Brings Composite Parts to Sports-car Arena

08.10.2009
A partnership between the University of Washington and the Italian sports-car company Automobili Lamborghini has been formalized, and the presidents of both organizations today attended the naming ceremony of the UW's Automobili Lamborghini Advanced Composite Structures Laboratory.

The UW is the first university in the country to collaborate with Lamborghini. The company has committed to provide substantial funding for lab equipment and support for UW undergraduate and graduate students.

"This partnership is a win-win situation," said Matthew O'Donnell, dean of the UW's College of Engineering. "It further establishes the Pacific Northwest as a leader in composites research, it funds equipment for a UW engineering lab and it provides students with valuable research experience that's directly tied to real-world applications."

The UW and Lamborghini have worked closely during the past two years. The UW lab has hosted Lamborghini engineers for month-long periods; UW faculty have traveled to Italy to conduct small classes on the fundamentals of composites design and certification; and the university has sent engineering graduate students for internships at Lamborghini’s Bologna headquarters.

"Lamborghini remains committed to investing in its future, and advancing carbon fiber composite technologies is the key to achieving many of our goals," said Lamborghini president Stephan Winkelmann, who attended the ceremony. "The UW and its collaborations have enabled Automobili Lamborghini to proceed with confidence in the development of innovative, composite-intensive structures."

Composite materials are made up of distinct parts – plywood, fiberglass and polyester are all composite materials. High-end industries are beginning to use materials such as carbon fiber combined with epoxy, itself a composite material, to build stronger and lighter components.

"Composites are no longer the future, they are the present of structural materials for anything that’s high-performance, whether it’s aerospace or golf clubs or sports cars," said lab director Paolo Feraboli, a UW assistant professor of aeronautics and astronautics. "Monolithic materials like aluminum just won't cut it anymore."

Feraboli, a native of Italy, earned his undergraduate degree in Bologna and worked at Lamborghini on composite materials in 2001 and 2002. He continued a relationship with Lamborghini while establishing the UW’s Advanced Composite Structures Laboratory in 2007.

The lab's equipment includes a lightning-strike generator for simulated lightning strikes up to 100,000 amps; a drop tower for inflicting damage from foreign objects; a pneumatic crash sled capable of crushing full-size vehicle prototypes; and a high-speed video camera that can take 82,000 frames per second.

Research focuses on short-term, industry-driven testing of new materials in scenarios such as bird strike, lightning strike or, in this case, crashes.

Lamborghini uses carbon fiber, a strong, lightweight composite material, in its new cars. The Murcielago LP 670-4 SuperVeloce incorporates carbon composites in its floor, transmission tunnel and outer skin, for a total of roughly one third composite materials by weight. Lamborghini says it plans to increase power-to-weight ratios of its cars by using composites to decrease the vehicles' overall mass, which also lowers carbon dioxide emissions.

For more than a decade UW aeronautics engineers have worked closely with the Boeing Co. to develop and test composite parts for the 787 Dreamliner. Testing for Lamborghini means exploring different questions, as well as having the flexibility to develop prototype parts in a shorter turnaround time, Feraboli noted.

Today's events at the UW, sponsored by Lamborghini, included speeches, test drives of Lamborghini cars and lab tours.

"Partnerships between the UW and industry leaders like Lamborghini give our students the advantage of working on real-world problems," said UW President Mark Emmert. “We are excited that UW researchers and Lamborghini engineers will be collaborating to bring innovative materials to the automobile industry.”

For more information, contact Feraboli at 206-543-2170 or feraboli@aa.washington.edu

Feraboli | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.washington.edu

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Serendipity uncovers borophene's potential
23.02.2017 | Northwestern University

nachricht Switched-on DNA
20.02.2017 | Arizona State University

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>