Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Texas Tech’s Fibertect Selected As Top Innovation by Cotton Incorporated

28.10.2010
Fibertect®, a decontamination technology developed by researchers at Texas Tech University, was one of seven new innovations selected by Cotton Incorporated to show the versatility of the fiber.

The products are highlighted in short vignettes on Cotton Incorporated’s Cotton Today website.

In 2005, Seshadri Ramkumar and his team at the Institute of Environmental and Human Health (TIEHH) at Texas Tech leveraged the absorbent capabilities of cotton to create the Fibertect® wipe that can absorb and neutralize gases and liquids that might be used in chemical warfare.

“To be recognized by the U.S. cotton industry as one of seven inventions is humbling, as it showcases the practical use of cotton technology developed at Texas Tech,” Ramkumar said. “The need for decontamination wipes, such as the kind we’ve created here at TIEHH, were a top priority for the Department of Defense. Years ago, we began the research, developed a product and met a top national security issue. Now we’re finding even more uses for the material.”

The process to make Fibertect® has received a patent and has been validated for use as a low-cost decontamination wipe for the U.S. military. Also, the wipe’s qualities were re-engineered to create a better absorbent material to pick up the “chocolate mousse” oil slicks inundating Gulf Coast beaches following the Deepwater Horizon disaster.

Amit Kapoor is president of First Line Technology, which commercially distributes Fibertect® that is manufactured by Hobbs Bonded Fibers Inc. He said that unlike synthetic materials like polypropylene that are currently used in many oil containment booms, Fibertect® is made from environmentally friendly raw cotton and carbon.

“This summer, Fibertect® was taken to the empty beaches of Grand Isle, La., and then laid out on top of a blob of oil that had settled on the beach,” Kapoor said. “It worked very well in absorbing and containing the oil. First Line technology is really pleased to take the laboratory technology into marketplace. Fibertect® is a platform technology and is finding applications in military and oil spill situations.”

Kater Hake, vice president of agricultural and environmental research at Cotton Incorporated, said that cotton has been essentially a source of textile fiber for six millennia. However, creative organizations such as Texas Tech are evolving the use of cotton and, in the process, its future.

“At Cotton Incorporated, we define sustainability as practices that create an environmental, economic and societal benefit,” Hake said. “The developments of these organizations certainly address those three tiers of sustainability, and demonstrate the seemingly infinite uses for the cotton plant.”

To view Fibertect® and the other innovations highlighted by Cotton Incorporated, visit http://cottontoday.cottoninc.com/sustainability-multimedia/.

For more information on Fibertect® products from First Line Technology, visit www.firstlinetech.com.

To watch the segment on Fibertect®, visit http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9azlcim0k2Y

Find Texas Tech news, experts and story ideas at www.media.ttu.edu.

CONTACT: Seshadri Ramkumar, manager of the Nonwoven and Advanced Materials Laboratory, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health at Texas Tech University, (806) 445-1925, or s.ramkumar@ttu.edu; James Pruden, co-director of public relations, Cotton Incorporated,(212) 413-8306, or jpruden@cottoninc.com; Amit Kapoor, president, First Line Technology, (703) 995-7510 or akapoor@firstlinetech.com; Larry Hobbs, vice president of manufacturing Hobbs Bonded Fibers Inc., (254) 741-0040, or lhobbs@hobbsbondedfibers.com

John Davis | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.ttu.edu

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht ADIR Project: Lasers Recover Valuable Materials
21.07.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

nachricht High-tech sensing illuminates concrete stress testing
20.07.2017 | University of Leeds

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>