Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Two young researchers work on an alternative recyclable material for making surfboards

04.10.2007
The TXFOAM project, initiated by GAIA (the Association of Information Technologies’ Industries in the Basque Country), ESTIA (École Supérieure des Technologies Industrielles Avancées) and the University of the Basque Country (UPV-EHU), has managed to identify a new material which is less toxic and is a recyclable alternative to the foam currently used in the manufacture of surfboards.

The project, within the remit of the ELKANO mobility grants promoted by GAIA and the UPV-EHU – is being undertaken by two young Gipuzkoans: Borja Ponte, BSc in Chemical Sciences and a specialist in macromolecules and Julen Rementería, who has a degree in Company Administration and Management and a Masters degree in Sliding Sports Engineering and Marketing.

The surfing industry produces more than 750,000 surfboards per year, of which only a small percentage contain sustainable or biodegradable materials. This is why the TXFOAM project (www.txfoamproject.com) aims to tackle this environmental problem, above all by research in order to reduce the toxicity of the surfboards, maintaining and even enhancing their technical specifications.

The TX Foam project is being developed at the business incubator belonging to ESTIA in Hendaya, in collaboration with other agents and related entrepreneurs related to nautical sports activities, in the very heart of Aquitaine where 70% of boards of the European surfboard industry are made.

Phases in the project

The first phase of the project has just finalized – identifying a possible alternative material to be investigated and tested over the coming months. The new material is recyclable and less toxic than the current foam used, thus tackling the two biggest environmental problems facing the surfing industry. The results of the initial trials with this identified material have positively confirmed its feasibility.

The next phase of the project, optimisation and prototyping, will be undertaken over the coming six months, aimed at enhancing the new material to adapt it to the requirements demanded by the surfboard manufacturing industry. Recognised technological centres with the necessary equipment to this end will be co-operating with this second phase of the project.

Once the material is ready, the first prototypes of the table will be made and trials with them carried out by surfers of all levels, both amateur and professionals. Then, with the latest improvements incorporated, it is forecast that TX Foam, the commercial name for the new material, will be launched on the market for September 2008.

Irati Kortabitarte | alfa
Further information:
http://www.basqueresearch.com/berria_irakurri.asp?hizk=I&Berri_Kod=1433

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Spin current detection in quantum materials unlocks potential for alternative electronics
16.10.2017 | DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

nachricht Missing atoms in a forgotten crystal bring luminescence
11.10.2017 | King Abdullah University of Science & Technology (KAUST)

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

Im Focus: New nanomaterial can extract hydrogen fuel from seawater

Hybrid material converts more sunlight and can weather seawater's harsh conditions

It's possible to produce hydrogen to power fuel cells by extracting the gas from seawater, but the electricity required to do it makes the process costly. UCF...

Im Focus: Small collisions make big impact on Mercury's thin atmosphere

Mercury, our smallest planetary neighbor, has very little to call an atmosphere, but it does have a strange weather pattern: morning micro-meteor showers.

Recent modeling along with previously published results from NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft -- short for Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

Conference Week RRR2017 on Renewable Resources from Wet and Rewetted Peatlands

28.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A single photon reveals quantum entanglement of 16 million atoms

16.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

The melting ice makes the sea around Greenland less saline

16.10.2017 | Earth Sciences

On the generation of solar spicules and Alfvenic waves

16.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>