Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Safer and greener plastics - new recyclable compounds for consumer products

22.08.2007
With prices rising and environmental issues taking centre stage, EUREKA project E! 2819- FACTORY ECOPLAST is combining natural fibres with thermoplastics to create new recyclable compounds for consumer products and audio components.

As world markets expand, especially in developing countries, the need for new materials to satisfy production requirements continues to grow. At the same time, high oil prices push up the costs of petroleum derivatives such as polymers, in other words, plastics, used in innumerable consumer items.

One recent and very interesting line of research in the field of materials involves the combination of natural fibres with thermoplastics. Wood, flax, hemp and jute are just some of the natural materials now showing promise in this sort of use.

Partners in the EUREKA FACTORY ECOPLAST project decided to join efforts to develop a palletised compound suitable for injection moulding and extrusion processes, combining two or more material components in such a way that the resulting compound is better than any of the individual components alone.

“We need to develop new materials that are cheaper and better,” says FACTORY ECOPLAST coordinator Uros Znidaric of Slovenia’s ISOKON. “Ideally, such materials should also be more easily recyclable, reducing environmental impact.” Project partners looked at compounding conditions, palletising processes, deformation properties, compatibility between natural fibres and thermoplastics, injection moulding parameters and possible applications.

“Once we had enough information about different compound properties, we then focused on product selection,” says Znidaric. Final selection was based on key properties, including rigidity, weight and price. The ability to saw and drill the material was also considered, as well as wear and tear on machine equipment used in processing final products.

“The project was very successful,” says Znidaric. “We were able to define precise technological parameters for extrusion and an optimal palletising process for making compounds for injection moulding and extrusion. The new materials are suitable for use in the manufacture of a wide variety of products, including vacuum cleaner and lawn mower parts, storage boxes and even golf tees.”

Sounds good

Acoustic properties also became a focus of investigation. Znidaric explains, “Although wood is known for its good acoustics and is often used in musical instruments, today a lot of speaker boxes are made of injection-moulded polymers. We wanted to see if our new composite, which contains wood, might display better acoustic properties.”

FACTORY ECOPLASTIC results show that the wood fibre-filled composites developed under the project are indeed well suited to use in loudspeaker boxes. Znidaric says both damping of sound radiation and sound wave resistance for the material are comparable to those displayed by medium density fibreboard (MDF), one of the most commonly used materials in this application.

Further tests of the project’s new ‘EUREKA’ speaker boxes show higher frequency acoustic performance on a par with market leaders such as JVC and Nakamichi. The potential for FACTORY ECOPLASTIC commercialisation, say partners, is therefore very high.

Sally Horspool | alfa
Further information:
http://www.eureka.be
http://www.eureka.be/inaction/viewSuccessStory.do?docid=3554031

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht New value added to the ICSD (Inorganic Crystal Structure Database)
27.03.2017 | FIZ Karlsruhe – Leibniz-Institut für Informationsinfrastruktur GmbH

nachricht Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen
24.03.2017 | Carnegie Institution for Science

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Northern oceans pumped CO2 into the atmosphere

27.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

Fingerprint' technique spots frog populations at risk from pollution

27.03.2017 | Life Sciences

Big data approach to predict protein structure

27.03.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>