Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New high-tech concrete is lighter, stronger & green

10.05.2004


Australian scientists have developed a breakthrough low-cost, lightweight, concrete technology that is set to lower costs and speed up construction projects from residential homes to high-rise buildings.

HySSIL (High-Strength, Structural, Insulative, Lightweight) panels are manufactured using a new low energy, process developed by CSIRO Novel Materials & Processes. Dr Swee Liang Mak, who leads the HySSIL development team at CSIRO says, ’HySSIL is a revolutionary aerated cementitious (cement-based) product that is as strong as normal concrete but is only half as heavy. It provides up to five times the thermal insulation of concrete and is also impact and fire resistant’. ’HySSIL wall panels are also expected to offer significant cost advantages over existing products’, says Dr Mak.

’Significant savings are achieved because CSIRO HySSIL technology uses readily available raw materials in smaller quantities and the-low cost and low-energy technology developed by CSIRO. ’Unlike certain processes used to manufacture aerated products, HySSIL production does not require expensive autoclaves (curing equipment)’. Dr Mak says, ’This means there are significant savings on the cost of start-up manufacturing plant for HySSIL’.



HySSIL also offers the extra bonus of being easily recyclable.

Dr Mak adds, ’The use of lightweight building materials such as HySSIL will contribute to a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, by increasing the energy efficiency of buildings and reducing the energy used during transportation and construction. For example, HySSIL wall panels are light enough to assemble on site without the need for heavy lifting equipment.’

Dr Mak describes HySSIL as a platform technology for the development of a range of new products, including both structural and non-structural elements such as walls, roof tiles, floor systems, decks and noise barrier panels.

HySSIL panels are expected to be a competitive alternative to bricks, blocks, prefabricated wall panels, precast wall panels, aerated lightweight blocks and similar product currently used in the building and construction industry.

HySSIL technology was developed by CSIRO in conjunction with CMR Energy Technologies (CMRET), a wholly owned subsidiary of CMR Consultants (Australia) Pty Ltd, established to undertake research, development and commercialisation of new energy-related technologies.

The applied research phase of HySSIL was supported by an AusIndustry R&D START grant.

CMRET has established a company called HySSIL Pty Ltd with Applied Construction Technologies (ACT), a researcher, developer and marketer of advanced building, construction and engineering technologies in Australia and the Asia Pacific region.

HySSIL Pty Ltd is licensed by CSIRO to exploit the HySSIL technology worldwide for building applications.

Colin Knowles, a director of HySSIL Pty Ltd, says, ’We are focussing initially on the massive US$125 billion per annum global wall market. Our strategy is to commercialise the technology through regional sub-licences with manufacturers’.

HySSIL Pty Ltd is in active discussions with manufacturers in Australia, South East Asia, the USA and China.

For Further Information Contact:

Robert Peile, +61 3 9252 6587
CSIRO Industry Manager
Email: Robert.Peile@csiro.au

Ken Anderson, +61 3 9254 2052, mobile: 0414 457 214
Manager Marketing Communications
Email: Ken.Anderson@csiro.au

Roy Yong, Colin Knowles,+ 61 3 9654 6799
Directors
HySSIL Pty Ltd
Email: royyong@hyssil.com , colinknowles@hyssil.com

Rosie Schmedding | CSIRO
Further information:
http://www.csiro.au/index.asp?type=mediaRelease&id=Prconcrete2

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Serendipity uncovers borophene's potential
23.02.2017 | Northwestern University

nachricht Switched-on DNA
20.02.2017 | Arizona State University

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>