Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Parts containing ceramic material

03.06.2003


To date, machines carrying out electroerosion-based machining processes have only had use of automated parameters for metallic materials such as steel. In his thesis, Navarre Public University researcher and lecturer, Iñaki Puertas, presents technologies for those applications using ceramic material, a highly interesting development from a technological viewpoint as it enables the use of ceramics in the fabrication of parts requiring great hardness and durability such as medical prothesis or those designed for use in the aerospace sector.



The technical ceramic materials have a wide range of applications, in situations in which the following are required: resistance to wear or corrosion, high mechanical resistance together with resistance to high temperatures. Despite its exceptional mechanical, chemical and thermal properties, however, technical ceramic materials have not been wholly accepted in industrial applications, mainly due to the difficulties encountered during their manufacture, apart from the high costs associated with the process.

The technological tables, drawn up for the three conducting ceramic materials analysed in the research (hot-pressed boron carbide, silicon-infiltrated silicon carbide and tungsten carbide in cobalt metallic matrix) will enable the choice of suitable operating conditions in the electroerosion process in order to obtain a determined value of surface roughness of the parts. And this in function of two distinct machining strategies: one which maximises the rate of elimination of material and the other which minimises the wear of the electrode. The main types of conducting ceramic materials for industrial application are thus coated.


Electroerosion applied to ceramics

Machining by electroerosion is a non-conventional manufacturing process based on the elimination of material of a part by means of a repeated series of electrical discharges taking place between a tool – known as the electrode – and the part or work piece; all this in the presence of a dielectric fluid or oil. This fluid enables the evacuation of eroded particles from the space between the electrode – and the part. The main disadvantage is that it can only be applied in those cases where the materials are sufficiently conducting. This is why, traditionally, it has been basically applied to metallic materials such as steel. In this research, the process of electroerosion is studied for the three technical ceramic materials which, given their greater conductivity compared with other ceramic materials, are known as ceramic conductors.

These ceramic materials have superior properties to other materials: hardness, resistance to wear, resistance to corrosion and resistance to high temperature.

Obtaining of technological tables

All this has enabled the drawing up technological tables whereby the user, non-expert in the field of electroerosion, can employ a series of recommended values in their machine-tool programming. This is of great interest from a technological point of view, although these tables already existed for metallic materials such as steel, but quite scant – to date - in the case of ceramic conductors.

Contacts
Iñaki Casado Redin
Nafarroako Unibertsitate Publikoa
inaki.casado@unavarra.es
(+34) 948 16 97 82

gabinete.prensa@unavarra.es

Iñaki Casado Redin | Basque research
Further information:
http://www.unavarra.es

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Watching atoms move in hybrid perovskite crystals reveals clues to improving solar cells
22.11.2017 | University of California - San Diego

nachricht Fine felted nanotubes: CAU research team develops new composite material made of carbon nanotubes
22.11.2017 | Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Frictional Heat Powers Hydrothermal Activity on Enceladus

Computer simulation shows how the icy moon heats water in a porous rock core

Heat from the friction of rocks caused by tidal forces could be the “engine” for the hydrothermal activity on Saturn's moon Enceladus. This presupposes that...

Im Focus: Nanoparticles help with malaria diagnosis – new rapid test in development

The WHO reports an estimated 429,000 malaria deaths each year. The disease mostly affects tropical and subtropical regions and in particular the African continent. The Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC teamed up with the Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology IME and the Institute of Tropical Medicine at the University of Tübingen for a new test method to detect malaria parasites in blood. The idea of the research project “NanoFRET” is to develop a highly sensitive and reliable rapid diagnostic test so that patient treatment can begin as early as possible.

Malaria is caused by parasites transmitted by mosquito bite. The most dangerous form of malaria is malaria tropica. Left untreated, it is fatal in most cases....

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

Im Focus: Visual intelligence is not the same as IQ

Just because someone is smart and well-motivated doesn't mean he or she can learn the visual skills needed to excel at tasks like matching fingerprints, interpreting medical X-rays, keeping track of aircraft on radar displays or forensic face matching.

That is the implication of a new study which shows for the first time that there is a broad range of differences in people's visual ability and that these...

Im Focus: Novel Nano-CT device creates high-resolution 3D-X-rays of tiny velvet worm legs

Computer Tomography (CT) is a standard procedure in hospitals, but so far, the technology has not been suitable for imaging extremely small objects. In PNAS, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes a Nano-CT device that creates three-dimensional x-ray images at resolutions up to 100 nanometers. The first test application: Together with colleagues from the University of Kassel and Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht the researchers analyzed the locomotory system of a velvet worm.

During a CT analysis, the object under investigation is x-rayed and a detector measures the respective amount of radiation absorbed from various angles....

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Ecology Across Borders: International conference brings together 1,500 ecologists

15.11.2017 | Event News

Road into laboratory: Users discuss biaxial fatigue-testing for car and truck wheel

15.11.2017 | Event News

#Berlin5GWeek: The right network for Industry 4.0

30.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Underwater acoustic localization of marine mammals and vehicles

23.11.2017 | Information Technology

Enhancing the quantum sensing capabilities of diamond

23.11.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Meadows beat out shrubs when it comes to storing carbon

23.11.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>