Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Parts containing ceramic material

03.06.2003


To date, machines carrying out electroerosion-based machining processes have only had use of automated parameters for metallic materials such as steel. In his thesis, Navarre Public University researcher and lecturer, Iñaki Puertas, presents technologies for those applications using ceramic material, a highly interesting development from a technological viewpoint as it enables the use of ceramics in the fabrication of parts requiring great hardness and durability such as medical prothesis or those designed for use in the aerospace sector.



The technical ceramic materials have a wide range of applications, in situations in which the following are required: resistance to wear or corrosion, high mechanical resistance together with resistance to high temperatures. Despite its exceptional mechanical, chemical and thermal properties, however, technical ceramic materials have not been wholly accepted in industrial applications, mainly due to the difficulties encountered during their manufacture, apart from the high costs associated with the process.

The technological tables, drawn up for the three conducting ceramic materials analysed in the research (hot-pressed boron carbide, silicon-infiltrated silicon carbide and tungsten carbide in cobalt metallic matrix) will enable the choice of suitable operating conditions in the electroerosion process in order to obtain a determined value of surface roughness of the parts. And this in function of two distinct machining strategies: one which maximises the rate of elimination of material and the other which minimises the wear of the electrode. The main types of conducting ceramic materials for industrial application are thus coated.


Electroerosion applied to ceramics

Machining by electroerosion is a non-conventional manufacturing process based on the elimination of material of a part by means of a repeated series of electrical discharges taking place between a tool – known as the electrode – and the part or work piece; all this in the presence of a dielectric fluid or oil. This fluid enables the evacuation of eroded particles from the space between the electrode – and the part. The main disadvantage is that it can only be applied in those cases where the materials are sufficiently conducting. This is why, traditionally, it has been basically applied to metallic materials such as steel. In this research, the process of electroerosion is studied for the three technical ceramic materials which, given their greater conductivity compared with other ceramic materials, are known as ceramic conductors.

These ceramic materials have superior properties to other materials: hardness, resistance to wear, resistance to corrosion and resistance to high temperature.

Obtaining of technological tables

All this has enabled the drawing up technological tables whereby the user, non-expert in the field of electroerosion, can employ a series of recommended values in their machine-tool programming. This is of great interest from a technological point of view, although these tables already existed for metallic materials such as steel, but quite scant – to date - in the case of ceramic conductors.

Contacts
Iñaki Casado Redin
Nafarroako Unibertsitate Publikoa
inaki.casado@unavarra.es
(+34) 948 16 97 82

gabinete.prensa@unavarra.es

Iñaki Casado Redin | Basque research
Further information:
http://www.unavarra.es

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen
24.03.2017 | Carnegie Institution for Science

nachricht Researchers make flexible glass for tiny medical devices
24.03.2017 | Brigham Young University

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>