Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Making plastic smarter with protein

24.03.2003


How do you improve on plastic, a modern material that has already changed the way we do everything from design medical devices to build cars? Embed it with specialized proteins called enzymes, says Shekhar Garde, assistant professor of chemical engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

"Such protein-enhanced plastics might someday be able to act as ultra-hygienic surfaces or sensors to detect the presence of various chemicals," says Garde. These types of materials could have a wide range of applications, for example, in the security or medical industries.

Proteins require water to function, however. Nonwatery environments do not provide the driving force necessary to keep proteins in their normally intricately folded state; unfolded, the molecules cease to function. To learn what it takes to successfully integrate proteins into a dry substance such as plastic, Garde and his graduate student Lu Yang use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to create a computer model of the proteins and study the molecules in both watery and non-watery environments such as organic solvents. They are working in collaboration with Jonathan S. Dordick, the Howard P. Isermann ’42 Professor of Chemical Engineering, who conducted the initial protein research.



Garde and Yang are presenting their research at the 225th national meeting of the American Chemical Society, held March 23-27 in New Orleans, La.

Proteins Are Powerful, but Sensitive

Proteins are "molecular machines," according to Garde, uniquely able to efficiently and reliably conduct chemical processes. Their powerful activity, however, is limited to relatively low temperatures and pressures. Helping proteins adapt to a non-water-based environment may actually increase the resiliency of the molecules and make them useful in situations they otherwise would not survive in, such as exposure to high temperatures or other extreme conditions. In addition to preserving protein’s known actions, the researchers speculate that they may also "discover that proteins could perform some new functions [in dry environments], something that they could not do in water," according to Yang.


CONTACT: Jonathan Dordick 518-276-2899; dordick@rpi.edu Shekhar Garde 518-276-6048; gardes@rpi.edu

CONTACT (During the ACS meeting): The ACS press room 504-586-4650 (Morial Convention Center, room 280)


Joely Johnson | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.rpi.edu/dept/NewsComm/

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Physicists gain new insights into nanosystems with spherical confinement
27.07.2017 | Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz

nachricht Getting closer to porous, light-responsive materials
26.07.2017 | Kyoto University

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Physicists Design Ultrafocused Pulses

Physicists working with researcher Oriol Romero-Isart devised a new simple scheme to theoretically generate arbitrarily short and focused electromagnetic fields. This new tool could be used for precise sensing and in microscopy.

Microwaves, heat radiation, light and X-radiation are examples for electromagnetic waves. Many applications require to focus the electromagnetic fields to...

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Programming cells with computer-like logic

27.07.2017 | Life Sciences

Identified the component that allows a lethal bacteria to spread resistance to antibiotics

27.07.2017 | Life Sciences

Malaria Already Endemic in the Mediterranean by the Roman Period

27.07.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>