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DuPont Zytel® HTN chosen for its temperature resistance and food compliance in new domestic food processor

The Taurus Mycook, a new food processor that also weighs, processes and cooks ingredients by induction heating, includes three components made of a food-approved grade of DuPont™ Zytel® HTN PPA polyphtalamide.

The high performance polymer from DuPont was selected by Spanish appliance manufacturer Taurus for the pitcher lid, pitcher support and insulating ring of the appliance due to its food compliance and long-term temperature resistance.

Photo: DuPont
DuPont™ Zytel® HTN was selected by Spanish appliance manufacturer Taurus for the pitcher lid, pitcher support and insulating ring of its new Mycook food processor due to its food compliance and long-term temperature resistance.

When designing the three parts moulded in the high-performance polymer from DuPont, Taurus’ primary objectives were for the components to be cold-to-the-touch – of particular importance for the pitcher lid – lightweight and robust, while combining an attractive appearance with design freedom. The particular grade of Zytel® HTN selected by Taurus retains its mechanical properties such as strength, stiffness and toughness when exposed to heat and moisture over a multitude of cycles, involving temperatures of up to 200 °C and is approved for use in food applications.

The associated benefits for the consumer include the facilitated handling of the pitcher – due to its reduced weight – as well as the reduced risk of breakage or scolding for the user, thanks to the material’s heat insulation performance. The attractive polymer components are also easy-to-clean.

The Mycook food processor is one of the first multi-purpose food processors to use induction technology to cook food – helping reduce cooking time by providing rapid and uniform heating of the ingredients. As preparation and cooking time are minimal, the food retains its maximum of nutrients. The technology is also safe and environmentally-friendly, due to the reduction in electricity consumption.

The DuPont Engineering Polymers business manufactures and sells Crastin® PBT and Rynite® PET thermoplastic polyester resins, Delrin® acetal resins, Hytrel® thermoplastic polyester elastomers, DuPont™ ETPV engineering thermoplastic vulcanizates, Minlon® mineral reinforced nylon resins, Thermx® PCT polycyclohexylene dimethyl terephthalate, Tynex® filaments, Vespel® parts and shapes, Zenite® LCP liquid crystal polymers, Zytel® nylon resins and Zytel® HTN high-performance polyamides. These products serve global markets in the aerospace, appliance, automotive, consumer, electrical, electronic, healthcare, industrial, sporting goods and many other diversified industries.

DuPont is a science-based products and services company. Founded in 1802, DuPont puts science to work by creating sustainable solutions essential to a better, safer, healthier life for people everywhere. Operating in more than 70 countries, DuPont offers a wide range of innovative products and services for markets including agriculture and food; building and construction; communications; and transportation.

The DuPont Oval Logo, DuPont™, The miracles of science™ and all product names denoted with ® are registered trademarks or trademarks of DuPont or its affiliates.

This press release is based on information from
Taurus Group
Avda. Barcelona, s/n
25790 – Oliana (Lleida)
Tel: +34 973 47 05 50
Fax: +34 973 47 05 24

Horst Ulrich Reimer | Du Pont
Further information:

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