Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

PolyU spearheads research in nanostructured materials

03.04.2009
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has recently received research funding totaling more than $9 million from the Research Grants Council (RGC), the Innovation and Technology Fund (ITF) and industry partners to advance the study of nanostructured materials on both theoretical and technological application sides.

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has recently received research funding totaling more than $9 million from the Research Grants Council (RGC), the Innovation and Technology Fund (ITF) and industry partners to advance the study of nanostructured materials on both theoretical and technological application sides.

The grants will support two nanotech projects led by Prof. Lu Jian, Chair Professor and Head of PolyU's Department of Mechanical Engineering. The project funded by ITF-affiliated "Nano and Advanced Materials Institute Ltd" (NAMI) is expected to benefit the aerospace and steel industries; while the collaborative research supported by RGC will help demystify the underlying principle of nanostructure and establish related theory. Theories and multiscale numerical simulation tools will be developed from molecular level to macroscopic structural level that could be applied to car and aircraft.

In carrying out the ITF NAMI-funded project entitled "Development of the Layered Nanostructured Metallic Sheet/Plate for Structural Applications", PolyU has also won the support of two industry partners, namely the famous Baosteel Group Company of China and the European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company. Both are Fortune 500 companies while the latter is a global leader in aerospace, defence and related services.

Prof. Lu said this partnering has enabled PolyU to enhance its leading position in the technology of nanomaterials research for structural applications. He will lead a team to explore the potential of their newly-developed nanomaterials in structural applications for different targeted industrial sectors. The platform to be applied in their investigation of residual stress distribution measurement in nanostructured materials is unique in the world. Its application is also far-reaching and could be extended to other alloys and composites based on nanocrystalline materials or amorphous materials.

To better understand the underlying mechanism of the nanostructured generation of materials and its multiscale failure modes, Prof. Lu is also taking the lead in studying the "Design and Realization of Structural Materials with High Strength and High Ductility" together with nanotechnology experts from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, the Chinese University of Hong Kong and the University of Hong Kong. Through this project, the team will collaborate with three internationally well-known institutions from the US and France (namely the University of California at Berkeley, Pennsylvania State University in the US; and INRIA, the French national institute for research in computer science and control).

The project will address four key issues that would emerge when integrating the nanostructured materials for structural applications. They are (1) Improving the ductility of nanostructured materials and producing the materials at large scale; (2) Development of advanced numerical simulation tools for studying two highly conflicting key mechanical properties: Strength and Ductility; (3) Development of advanced experimental methods for investigating the fundamental fracture mechanisms; and (4) Development of joining technology for nanostructured materials using "Pulsed Laser Welding", and to optimize the welding conditions for conserving the nanostructures and the strength of the nanostructured materials.

Prof. Lu is a pioneering researcher in the fields of material science and engineering, mechanical engineering and mechanics. In studying nano-scale structural materials, the research teams leaded by Prof. J.Lu and his collaborator Prof. K.Lu (IMR, CAS) put forward the idea of "Nitriding Iron at Lower Temperatures" to refine the microstructure on the surface layer of an iron plate, and the article was published in the Science Magazine (January 31, 2003 issue). He also co-invented the SMAT together with Prof. Lu Ke of the Chinese Academy of Sciences with several issued patents in Europe, USA and China.

The sophisticated SMAT process could bring about a change in surface microstructure through generating an in-situ nanocrystalline layer on the surface of bulk metal. While most surface-modification techniques for solid materials are based on chemical reactions, SMAT seeks to reduce the grains sizes down to nanometer scale on the top surface layer through random mechanical plastic deformation. Hence this process represents a new approach to modify the properties and functionalities of the surface layer of materials.

This advanced technique can be combined with traditional work surface treatment methods to improve the mechanical properties of materials. It is applicable to producing advanced composite materials for a wide range of industries, including automotive, aerospace, civil structures, machinery, power generation, and bio-medical industry.

Over the years, Prof. Lu has received numerous honours for his breakthroughs. In 2006, he was awarded "The French Knight Order of National Merit" (Chevalier de l'Ordre National du Merite) by the French Government in recognition of his illustrious research and academic achievements. He further received a Gold Medal with Mention and a Special Prize in the 2007 Brussels Eureka Expo - The 56th World Exhibition of Invention, Research and Industrial Innovation for his invention "Nanostructured Materials Generation System – SMAT".

The two new research projects will continue the research work carried out by the Department of Mechanical Engineering since 2005, under the niche area scheme in the field of nanotechnology research with a focus on the Product Engineering through the Integration of Advanced and Nano-materials in Design. It will enhance the research capacity and ensure the worldwide leadership of PolyU in this research area of structural nano-materials in the future.

Evelyn Chan | Research asia research news
Further information:
http://www.researchsea.com
http://www.polyu.edu.hk/cpa/polyu/hotnews/details_e.php?year=2009&news_id=1608

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht The stacked colour sensor
16.11.2017 | Empa - Eidgenössische Materialprüfungs- und Forschungsanstalt

nachricht Counterfeits and product piracy can be prevented by security features, such as printed 3-D microstructures
16.11.2017 | Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT)

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

Im Focus: Visual intelligence is not the same as IQ

Just because someone is smart and well-motivated doesn't mean he or she can learn the visual skills needed to excel at tasks like matching fingerprints, interpreting medical X-rays, keeping track of aircraft on radar displays or forensic face matching.

That is the implication of a new study which shows for the first time that there is a broad range of differences in people's visual ability and that these...

Im Focus: Novel Nano-CT device creates high-resolution 3D-X-rays of tiny velvet worm legs

Computer Tomography (CT) is a standard procedure in hospitals, but so far, the technology has not been suitable for imaging extremely small objects. In PNAS, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes a Nano-CT device that creates three-dimensional x-ray images at resolutions up to 100 nanometers. The first test application: Together with colleagues from the University of Kassel and Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht the researchers analyzed the locomotory system of a velvet worm.

During a CT analysis, the object under investigation is x-rayed and a detector measures the respective amount of radiation absorbed from various angles....

Im Focus: Researchers Develop Data Bus for Quantum Computer

The quantum world is fragile; error correction codes are needed to protect the information stored in a quantum object from the deteriorating effects of noise. Quantum physicists in Innsbruck have developed a protocol to pass quantum information between differently encoded building blocks of a future quantum computer, such as processors and memories. Scientists may use this protocol in the future to build a data bus for quantum computers. The researchers have published their work in the journal Nature Communications.

Future quantum computers will be able to solve problems where conventional computers fail today. We are still far away from any large-scale implementation,...

Im Focus: Wrinkles give heat a jolt in pillared graphene

Rice University researchers test 3-D carbon nanostructures' thermal transport abilities

Pillared graphene would transfer heat better if the theoretical material had a few asymmetric junctions that caused wrinkles, according to Rice University...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Ecology Across Borders: International conference brings together 1,500 ecologists

15.11.2017 | Event News

Road into laboratory: Users discuss biaxial fatigue-testing for car and truck wheel

15.11.2017 | Event News

#Berlin5GWeek: The right network for Industry 4.0

30.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA detects solar flare pulses at Sun and Earth

17.11.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

NIST scientists discover how to switch liver cancer cell growth from 2-D to 3-D structures

17.11.2017 | Health and Medicine

The importance of biodiversity in forests could increase due to climate change

17.11.2017 | Studies and Analyses

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>