Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Plasma technology for solvent-free utility wood

28.07.2010
The DURAWOOD research project modifies wood surfaces so that wood preservatives adhere to them better and makes it difficult for harmful fungi to colonise the wood. So-called plasma technology is a highly promising approach. ttz Bremerhaven is evaluating the effectiveness of the process with a genetic detection method.

In order to raise the competitiveness of wood compared to other materials, it is necessary to develop a cost-efficient method of wood protection which is free of toxic chemicals and nevertheless guarantees the wood's long durability.

DURAWOOD, a research project funded by the European Union, has set itself the objective of developing a cost-effective, ecological, and high-performance method: the so-called DURAWOOD process uses electrical gas discharge (plasma) to treat wooden surfaces. The aim is to alter the surface characteristics of the wood so that wood preservatives can adhere to it better and thus smaller amounts of fungicide be needed.

So that wood is attractive for customers, it must be possible to guarantee the durability of treated wooden facades for at least 5 to 8 years and without the need for any additional maintenance. New EU legislation (2004/42/EC) demands the replacement of solvent-based wood preservatives for exterior purposes. However, facades which have been treated with water-based preservatives are more susceptible to discolouring and damage from mould, blue-stain fungi, and other wood-decay fungi. The aim is for a pre-treatment of the wood by means of plasma tech-nology to improve the effectiveness of this water-soluble wood preservative.

Plasma technology seals the wood surface

The plasma technology is based on applying the principle of electrical gas discharge where a so-called plasma is temporarily produced. The plasma is a gas or gas mix which has been partly or fully ionised and thus contains free charge carriers such as ions, charged molecules or electrons. The plasma is produced with the aid of a DCSBD (Diffuse Coplanar Surface Barrier Discharge) electrode of the newest genera-tion. The wood is transported past the electrode and treated section by section with plasma. The aim of the plasma treatment is to change the characteristics of the wood surface, whereby two applications are used: On the one hand, the adhesion of coatings subsequently applied, such as water-based wood preservatives, is improved by means of a hydrophilisation of the wood surface, and on the other hand the wettability of the wood can be reduced by a marginal variation in the plasma parameters, as a result of which hydrophobic surfaces are produced which increase the water resistance of the wood.

Genetic detection method for mould

The DURAWOOD technology aims to facilitate a cost-efficient, durable, and environmentally friendly wood preservative and to strengthen the competitiveness of the European wood-processing industry. To test the efficiency of this new approach, the Molecular Genetics Department at ttz Bremerhaven is developing a rapid detection method for wood-decay fungi, with which the woods treated with the DURAWOOD process are being tested for their effective protection against fungi. For this purpose, pure cultures of the fungus being studied were incubated together with the wood either treated with DURAWOOD or untreated. The next step investigates how far the fungus has grown into the wood, using the highly sensitive PCR method, which is able to detect even only a few fungus cells.

ttz Bremerhaven is one of three research partners. Together with IRIS (Innovacio i Recerca Industrial i Sostenible, Barcelona), the Project Coordinator, and the Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, ttz is a research service provider in the consortium. The consortium's industrial partners are composed on the one hand of the following wood-processing firms: Ing. Ján Šestina – SETA from Slovakia, Kartas Kontrplak Sanayi Ticaret from Turkey, and Aryecla, S.L. from Spain, and on the other hand of the following companies in the supply chain of the targeted technology: Plasma Technologic s.r.o. from the Czech Republic, which is specialised in plasma technology; PAM-ak s.r.o. from Slovakia and SETAS KIMYA SAN AS from Turkey are both manufacturers of wood coatings.

ttz Bremerhaven regards itself as an innovative provider of research services and operates in the field of application-oriented research and development. Under the umbrella of ttz Bremerhaven, an international team of experts is working in the areas of food, environment, health and consulting services.

Contact:
Christian Colmer
Head of Communication and Media
ttz Bremerhaven
Fischkai 1
D-27572 Bremerhaven (Germany)
Tel.: +49 (0)471 48 32 - 124
Fax: +49 (0)471 48 32 - 129
ccolmer@ttz-bremerhaven.de

Christian Colmer | idw
Further information:
http://www.ttz-bremerhaven.de

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht New biomaterial could replace plastic laminates, greatly reduce pollution
21.09.2017 | Penn State

nachricht Stopping problem ice -- by cracking it
21.09.2017 | Norwegian University of Science and Technology

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet

Plants and algae use the enzyme Rubisco to fix carbon dioxide, removing it from the atmosphere and converting it into biomass. Algae have figured out a way to increase the efficiency of carbon fixation. They gather most of their Rubisco into a ball-shaped microcompartment called the pyrenoid, which they flood with a high local concentration of carbon dioxide. A team of scientists at Princeton University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University and the Max Plank Institute of Biochemistry have unravelled the mysteries of how the pyrenoid is assembled. These insights can help to engineer crops that remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing more food.

A warming planet

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity

22.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Penn first in world to treat patient with new radiation technology

22.09.2017 | Medical Engineering

Calculating quietness

22.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>