Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Plasma processes paving the way to high performance cutting tools

12.09.2013
PVD coatings for sophisticated metal cutting operations benefit from the advanced state of development of plasma technology at Fraunhofer FEP.

Metal cutting operations play an especially important role in modern industrial production processes. Based on the tremendous development of multi-axis machine tools, cutting operations represent an ever increasing part of manufacturing process steps.


PVD-coatings for high performance cutting Tools

Instead of preparing specific tools and forms for different work pieces, these are produced in universal machining centers using CAD/CAM control and, in the course of time, a huge amount of cutting inserts.

To realize ever faster production and, at the same time, to guarantee an excellent quality level of the treated workpiece, the development of high performance cutting tools with tailored, wear-resistant coatings has become a key factor for the tool industry.

Multilayered PVD coatings ensure superior wear resistance even under severe cutting conditions. Tailored compositions and architecture of the coatings help to adapt them to tool materials and to the tool geometry used in specific cutting operations, as well as to the work materials to be treated. High power pulse magnetron sputtering (PMS) offers complete flexibility in developing such coatings, be it with respect to the coating material or to the coating architecture. This holds for both high speed and high precision cutting tools.

The pulsed magnetron sputtering process allows deposition of extremely dense and smooth layers free of droplets. By co-sputtering of different materials in a reactive gas atmosphere, a variety of layer compositions, including periodic and aperiodic sequences and graded transitions between individual layers can be synthesized. Single-phase nanocrystalline oxides especially show high thermal stability and chemical inertness. Utilizing advanced pulsed power supplies and a fast feedback control, ternary oxide coatings can also be deposited in long-term, stable deposition processes, resulting in pure single phase coatings. Intrinsic and thermally induced compressive stresses are moderate, and they enhance the wear resistance.

A highly effective plasma pretreatment guarantees excellent adhesion of the coatings. The flange-mounted plasma source LAVOPLAS has been developed to create a dense plasma in a volume corresponding to a typical industrial size batch coating device. It can be used for substrate etching as well as for plasma-activated deposition processes when a high flux of ions is required. The energy of the charged particles can be influenced by a substrate bias voltage to maximize the effect of the preferred ionization or excitation processes. In combination with high power pulsed sputtering, a unique technology sequence for the coating of tools with high-end layer-stacks is available.

Wear-resistant layers are just one example demonstrating the capabilities of plasma and electron beam processes developed at Fraunhofer FEP. You can find more details and a variety of other application examples on our website www.fep.fraunhofer.de, or visit us at the EMO fair in Hannover, at stand no. 54, hall 13, from September 16 – 20, 2013. Together with other Fraunhofer partners we will demonstrate the benefits of advanced plasma techniques for the coating of tools and parts. We are looking forward to welcoming you and discussing your requirements.

Press contact:
Annett Arnold
Fraunhofer-Institut für Elektronenstrahl- und Plasmatechnik FEP | Phone +49 351 2586 452 | Annett.Arnold@fep.fraunhofer.de

Winterbergstraße 28 | 01277 Dresden | Gemany | www.fep.fraunhofer.de

Annett Arnold | Fraunhofer-Institut
Further information:
http://www.fep.fraunhofer.de/components

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Less is more to produce top-notch 2D materials
20.11.2017 | The Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR)

nachricht The stacked colour sensor
16.11.2017 | Empa - Eidgenössische Materialprüfungs- und Forschungsanstalt

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

Im Focus: Visual intelligence is not the same as IQ

Just because someone is smart and well-motivated doesn't mean he or she can learn the visual skills needed to excel at tasks like matching fingerprints, interpreting medical X-rays, keeping track of aircraft on radar displays or forensic face matching.

That is the implication of a new study which shows for the first time that there is a broad range of differences in people's visual ability and that these...

Im Focus: Novel Nano-CT device creates high-resolution 3D-X-rays of tiny velvet worm legs

Computer Tomography (CT) is a standard procedure in hospitals, but so far, the technology has not been suitable for imaging extremely small objects. In PNAS, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes a Nano-CT device that creates three-dimensional x-ray images at resolutions up to 100 nanometers. The first test application: Together with colleagues from the University of Kassel and Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht the researchers analyzed the locomotory system of a velvet worm.

During a CT analysis, the object under investigation is x-rayed and a detector measures the respective amount of radiation absorbed from various angles....

Im Focus: Researchers Develop Data Bus for Quantum Computer

The quantum world is fragile; error correction codes are needed to protect the information stored in a quantum object from the deteriorating effects of noise. Quantum physicists in Innsbruck have developed a protocol to pass quantum information between differently encoded building blocks of a future quantum computer, such as processors and memories. Scientists may use this protocol in the future to build a data bus for quantum computers. The researchers have published their work in the journal Nature Communications.

Future quantum computers will be able to solve problems where conventional computers fail today. We are still far away from any large-scale implementation,...

Im Focus: Wrinkles give heat a jolt in pillared graphene

Rice University researchers test 3-D carbon nanostructures' thermal transport abilities

Pillared graphene would transfer heat better if the theoretical material had a few asymmetric junctions that caused wrinkles, according to Rice University...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Ecology Across Borders: International conference brings together 1,500 ecologists

15.11.2017 | Event News

Road into laboratory: Users discuss biaxial fatigue-testing for car and truck wheel

15.11.2017 | Event News

#Berlin5GWeek: The right network for Industry 4.0

30.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Antarctic landscape insights keep ice loss forecasts on the radar

20.11.2017 | Earth Sciences

Filling the gap: High-latitude volcanic eruptions also have global impact

20.11.2017 | Earth Sciences

Water world

20.11.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>