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NJIT licensee invents industrial process for grinding cement and other cementitious materials

14.07.2010
Flyanic (www.flyanic.com), a cementitious mineral processing technology company and licensee of NJIT, has developed an industrial scale and affordable process for grinding cement, fly ash, and other cementitious materials to a median particle size of one micron. The processing costs range from $30-75 per ton, depending on feedstock, and they can be scaled to industrial levels of production using proven equipment.

Flyanic, along with its development partner, grinding-mill equipment manufacturer RSG Inc. (www.ultrafinegrind.com), recently applied the NJIT technology to the design of a vertical-stirred media mill to perform the pilot scale demonstrations.

Cementitious materials ground to ultra-fine particle sizes have significant benefits in a range of industrial applications, including specialized grouts for oil and gas exploration. Fly ash and slag, finer than 10 microns, are high reactivity super-pozzolans for building products such as high performance structural concrete and pre-cast concrete. A one micron median fly ash product has not been previously available on an affordable industrial scale.

Flyanic is an IgniteIP (www.igniteip.com) portfolio company, formed around patented technology developed at NJIT. Flyanic is located at NJIT's Enterprise Development Center in Newark. RSG, Inc. is a privately held manufacturer of stirred media mills and air classifiers in business for over 20 years. RSG is located in Sylacauga, Alabama. Flyanic and RSG continue to perform ground-breaking research in the development of industrial scale grinding systems for processing ultra-fine cementitious materials.

NJIT, New Jersey's science and technology university,enrolls more than 8,800 students pursuing bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees in 120 programs. The university consists of six colleges: Newark College of Engineering, College of Architecture and Design, College of Science and Liberal Arts, School of Management, College of Computing Sciences and Albert Dorman Honors College. U.S. News & World Report's 2009 Annual Guide to America's Best Colleges ranked NJIT in the top tier of national research universities. NJIT is internationally recognized for being at the edge in knowledge in architecture, applied mathematics, wireless communications and networking, solar physics, advanced engineered particulate materials, nanotechnology, neural engineering and e-learning. Many courses and certificate programs, as well as graduate degrees, are available online through the Office of Continuing Professional Education.

Sheryl Weinstein | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.njit.edu

Further reports about: NJIT RSG industrial application industrial scale

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