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New Type of Nanowires, Built with Natural Gas Heating

05.02.2016

A new simple, cost-effective approach that may open up an effective way to make other metallic/semiconducting nanomaterials.

A team of Korean researchers, affiliated with Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has recently pioneered in developing a new simple nanowire manufacturing technique that uses self-catalytic growth process assisted by thermal decomposition of natural gas. A


From top left are Prof. Soojin Park, Dr. Sinho Choi, Researcher Jieun Kim (KRICT) and from bottom left are Prof. Sang Kyu Kwak and Researcher Dae Yeon Hwang. | Contents by: Sinho Choi, Design by: Dukgi Lee

Copyright : UNIST

ccording to the research team, this method is simple, reproducible, size-controllable, and cost-effective in that lithium-ion batteries could also benefit from it.

In their approach, they discovered that germanium nanowires are grown by the reduction of germanium oxide particles and subsequent self-catalytic growth during the thermal decomposition of natural gas, and simultaneously, carbon sheath layers are uniformly coated on the nanowire surface.

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This study is a collaboration among scientists, including Prof. SooJin Park (School of Energy and Chemical Engineering) and Prof. Sang Kyu Kwak (School of Energy and Chemical Engineering), Dr. Sinho Choi (UNIST), Combined M.S./Ph.D. Student Dae Yeon Hwang (UNIST), and Researcher Jieun Kim (Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology).

In a study, reported in the January 21, 2016 issue of Nano Letters, the team demonstrated a new redox-responsive assembly method to synthesize hierarchically structured carbon-sheathed germanium nanowires (c-GeNWs) on a large scale by the use of self-catalytic growth process assisted by thermally decomposed natural gas.

According to the team, this simple synthetic process not only enables them to synthesize hierachially assembled materials from inexpensive metal oxides at a larger scale, but also can likely be extended to other metal oxides as well. Moreover, the resulting hierarchically assembled nanowires (C-GeNWs) show enhanced chemical and thermal stability, as well as outstanding electrochemical properties.

The team states, "This strategy may open up an effective way to make other metallic/semiconducting nanomaterials via one-step synthetic reactions through an environmentally benign and cost-effective approach."

This work was supported by the Basic Science Research Program and Mid-Career Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grand, funded by the Korean government (MSIP).

Journal Reference:
Sinho Choi, Jieun Kim, Dae Yeon Hwang, Hyungmin Park, Jaegeon Ryu, Sang Kyu Kwak* and Soojin Park* "Generalized redox-responsive assembly of carbon-sheathed metallic and semiconducting nanowire heterostructures". Nano Lett. (2016)


Associated links
Original article from Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology

Journal information

Nano Letters

Funding information

Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (2015-01003143).

UNIST Public Relations Team | Research SEA
Further information:
http://www.researchsea.com

Further reports about: UNIST metal oxides nanowire nanowires natural gas

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