Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New insight into thermoelectric materials may boost green technologies

15.05.2014

A University of Miami physicist and his collaborators find remarkable thermoelectric properties for a metal that may impact the search for materials useful in power generation, refrigeration or energy detection

Thermoelectric materials can turn a temperature difference into an electric voltage. Among their uses in a variety of specialized applications: generating power on space probes and cooling seats in fancy cars.


Lithium purple-bronze (LiPB) is a thermoelectric material comprised of aligned conducting, zig-zag chains of molybdenum and oxygen (left image, pink and white circles with green bonds). When an electric current was applied in a direction slightly misaligned with the chains (depicted as gray lines, right image), heat flowed perpendicular to the current, a phenomenon known as the transverse Peltier effect. The efficiency of this effect in LiPB was among the largest known for a single compound.

Credit: Dr. Joshua Cohn, University of Miami

University of Miami (UM) physicist Joshua Cohn and his collaborators report new surprising properties of a metal named lithium purple-bronze (LiPB) that may impact the search for materials useful in power generation, refrigeration, or energy detection. The findings are published in the journal Physical Review Letters.

"If current efficiencies of thermoelectric materials were doubled, thermoelectric coolers might replace the conventional gas refrigerators in your home," said Cohn, professor and chairman of the UM Department of Physics in the College of Arts and Sciences and lead author of the study. "Converting waste heat into electric power, for example, using vehicle exhaust, is a near-term 'green' application of such materials."

Useful thermoelectric materials produce a large voltage for a given temperature difference, with the ratio known as "thermopower." LiPB is comprised of aligned conducting chains. The researchers found that this material has very different thermopowers when the temperature difference is applied parallel or perpendicular to the conducting chains.

When an electric current was applied in a direction slightly misaligned with the chains, heat flowed perpendicular to the current, a phenomenon known as the "transverse Peltier effect." The efficiency of this effect in LiPB was among the largest known for a single compound.

"That such a large directional difference in thermopower exists in a single compound is exceedingly rare and makes applications possible," Cohn said. "This is significant because transverse Peltier devices typically employ a sandwich of different compounds that is more complicated and costly to fabricate."

As their motivation for the work, Cohn noted that metals with a similar electronic structure often exhibit interesting physics and the thermoelectric properties of LiPB had never been studied in detail. "The present material," he said, "might be useful as it is, but the larger implication of our work is that the ingredients underlying its special properties may serve as a guide to finding or engineering new and improved materials."

###

The study is titled "Extreme Thermopower Anisotropy and Interchain Transport in the Quasi-One-Dimensional Metal Li0.9Mo6O17" Other authors of the study are Saeed Moshfeghyeganeh,Ph.D. student in the Department of Physics at UM; Carlos A. M. dos Santos, professor at the Escola de Engenharia de Lorena in Brazil and John J. Neumeier, professor in the Department of Physics, Montana State University.

Annette Gallagher | Eurek Alert!
Further information:
http://www.miami.edu/

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Graphene is strong, but is it tough?
05.02.2016 | DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

nachricht New Type of Nanowires, Built with Natural Gas Heating
05.02.2016 | Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST)

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Automated driving: Steering without limits

OmniSteer project to increase automobiles’ urban maneuverability begins with a € 3.4 million budget

Automobiles increase the mobility of their users. However, their maneuverability is pushed to the limit by cramped inner city conditions. Those who need to...

Im Focus: Microscopy: Nine at one blow

Advance in biomedical imaging: The University of Würzburg's Biocenter has enhanced fluorescence microscopy to label and visualise up to nine different cell structures simultaneously.

Fluorescence microscopy allows researchers to visualise biomolecules in cells. They label the molecules using fluorescent probes, excite them with light and...

Im Focus: NASA's ICESat-2 equipped with unique 3-D manufactured part

NASA's follow-on to the successful ICESat mission will employ a never-before-flown technique for determining the topography of ice sheets and the thickness of sea ice, but that won't be the only first for this mission.

Slated for launch in 2018, NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) also will carry a 3-D printed part made of polyetherketoneketone (PEKK),...

Im Focus: Sinking islands: Does the rise of sea level endanger the Takuu Atoll in the Pacific?

In the last decades, sea level has been rising continuously – about 3.3 mm per year. For reef islands such as the Maldives or the Marshall Islands a sinister picture is being painted evoking the demise of the island states and their cultures. Are the effects of sea-level rise already noticeable on reef islands? Scientists from the ZMT have now answered this question for the Takuu Atoll, a group of Pacific islands, located northeast of Papua New Guinea.

In the last decades, sea level has been rising continuously – about 3.3 mm per year. For reef islands such as the Maldives or the Marshall Islands a sinister...

Im Focus: Energy-saving minicomputers for the ‘Internet of Things’

The ‘Internet of Things’ is growing rapidly. Mobile phones, washing machines and the milk bottle in the fridge: the idea is that minicomputers connected to these will be able to process information, receive and send data. This requires electrical power. Transistors that are capable of switching information with a single electron use far less power than field effect transistors that are commonly used in computers. However, these innovative electronic switches do not yet work at room temperature. Scientists working on the new EU research project ‘Ions4Set’ intend to change this. The program will be launched on February 1. It is coordinated by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR).

“Billions of tiny computers will in future communicate with each other via the Internet or locally. Yet power consumption currently remains a great obstacle”,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

AKL’16: Experience Laser Technology Live in Europe´s Largest Laser Application Center!

02.02.2016 | Event News

From intelligent knee braces to anti-theft backpacks

26.01.2016 | Event News

DATE 2016 Highlighting Automotive and Secure Systems

26.01.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

A new potential biomarker for cancer imaging

05.02.2016 | Life Sciences

Graphene is strong, but is it tough?

05.02.2016 | Materials Sciences

Tiniest Particles Shrink Before Exploding When Hit With SLAC's X-ray Laser

05.02.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>