Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Nanoscale composites improve MRI

16.06.2014

Rice, Methodist researchers merge magnetic particles to detect, fight disease

Submicroscopic particles that contain even smaller particles of iron oxide could make magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) a far more powerful tool to detect and fight disease.


Silicon mesoporous particles, aka SiMPS, about 1,000 nanometers across contain thousands of much smaller particles of iron oxide. The SiMPs can be manipulated by magnets and gather at the site of tumors, where they can be heated to kill malignant tumors or trigger the release of drugs. The particles were created by an international team led by scientists at Rice University and The Methodist Hospital Research Institute in Houston.

Credit: Wilson Group/Rice University


Submicrometer particles that contain even smaller particles of iron oxide could make magnetic resonance imaging a far more powerful tool to detect and fight disease, according to researchers at Rice University.

Credit: Ayrat Gizzatov/Rice University

Scientists at Rice University and The Methodist Hospital Research Institute (TMHRI) led an international team of researchers in creating composite particles that can be injected into patients and guided by magnetic fields. Once in position, the particles may be heated to kill malignant tissues or trigger the release of drugs at the site.

The "nanoconstructs" should fully degrade and leave the body within a few days, they reported.

The research appears online in the journal Advanced Functional Materials.

The team led by Rice chemist Lon Wilson and TMHRI scientist Paolo Decuzzi was searching for a way to overcome the challenges presented by iron oxide particles that are good at some things but not others, depending on their size.

Iron oxide particles have many excellent qualities: They can be manipulated with magnets, provide excellent contrast under MRI, create heat when triggered and degrade quickly. But they can't do all that at once. The team needed a way to decouple the functions from their sizes.

The answer was to package thousands of iron oxide particles – with magnetic cores as small as 5 nanometers across – inside larger particles.

The researchers made two such nanoconstructs, embedding iron oxide particles in silicon mesoporous particles (SiMPs) and discoidal polymeric nanoconstructs (DPNs). They knew from previous research that submicron-sized SiMPs and DPNs naturally accumulate within the tumor's blood vessels.

Iron oxide enhances the ability to position and hold the particles in place with magnets, said lead author and Rice graduate student Ayrat Gizzatov. "They get attracted by the magnet, and that induces another dipole-dipole magnetic interaction among the particles and increases their interparticle communication mechanism," he said.

Tests showed iron oxide particles made the nanoconstructs 10 times better than traditional contrast agents with what amounted to significantly lower doses of iron than used in current practice.

The new research also showed that, as a general principle, confining MRI contrast agents (like iron oxide) in geometric structures enhances their relaxivity – the property that makes the agents appear in MRI images. (The shorter the relaxation time, the greater the contrast in the image.)

While the particles are too big to target specific proteins, Gizzatov said it might also be possible to modify them with elements that will increase their accumulation in tumors.

###

Co-authors are Adem Guven of Rice; Jaehong Key, Santosh Aryal, Jeyarama Ananta, Xuewu Liu and Meng Zhong, all of TMHRI; Anna Lisa Palange and Daniele Di Mascolo of TMHRI and the University of Magna Graecia, Italy; Matteo Fasano and Antonio Cervadoro of TMHRI and the University of Turin, Italy; Cinzia Stigliano of TMHRI and the University of Bari, Italy; Eliodoro Chiavazzo and Pietro Asinari of the University of Turin; and Mauro Ferrari of Weill Cornell Medical College, New York.

The Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, the National Institutes of Health, the Welch Foundation, the Interpolytechnic Doctoral School of Turin, the Italian Ministry of Research, the Doctoral School of the University of Magna Graecia, the European Social Fund and the Regione Calabria supported the research.

Read the abstract at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/adfm.201400653/abstract

This news release can be found online at http://news.rice.edu/2014/06/16/nanoscale-composites-improve-mri/

Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews

Related Materials:

Wilson Group: http://www.ruf.rice.edu/~ljwgroup/

Paolo Decuzzi bio: http://www.houstonmethodist.org/paolodecuzzi

Images for download:

http://news.rice.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/0617_MRI-1-WEB.jpg

Silicon mesoporous particles, aka SiMPS, about 1,000 nanometers across contain thousands of much smaller particles of iron oxide. The SiMPs can be manipulated by magnets and gather at the site of tumors, where they can be heated to kill malignant tumors or trigger the release of drugs. The particles were created by an international team led by scientists at Rice University and The Methodist Hospital Research Institute in Houston. (Credit: Wilson Group/Rice University)

http://news.rice.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/0616_MRI-2-WEB.jpg

Submicrometer particles that contain even smaller particles of iron oxide could make magnetic resonance imaging a far more powerful tool to detect and fight disease, according to researchers at Rice University. (Illustration by Ayrat Gizzatov/Rice University)

Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation's top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,920 undergraduates and 2,567 graduate students, Rice's undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6.3-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice has been ranked No. 1 for best quality of life multiple times by the Princeton Review and No. 2 for "best value" among private universities by Kiplinger's Personal Finance. To read "What they're saying about Rice," go here.

David Ruth | Eurek Alert!

Further reports about: Iron MRI Methodist iron oxide particles particles tumors

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Decoding cement's shape promises greener concrete
08.12.2016 | Rice University

nachricht Scientists track chemical and structural evolution of catalytic nanoparticles in 3-D
08.12.2016 | DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Electron highway inside crystal

Physicists of the University of Würzburg have made an astonishing discovery in a specific type of topological insulators. The effect is due to the structure of the materials used. The researchers have now published their work in the journal Science.

Topological insulators are currently the hot topic in physics according to the newspaper Neue Zürcher Zeitung. Only a few weeks ago, their importance was...

Im Focus: Significantly more productivity in USP lasers

In recent years, lasers with ultrashort pulses (USP) down to the femtosecond range have become established on an industrial scale. They could advance some applications with the much-lauded “cold ablation” – if that meant they would then achieve more throughput. A new generation of process engineering that will address this issue in particular will be discussed at the “4th UKP Workshop – Ultrafast Laser Technology” in April 2017.

Even back in the 1990s, scientists were comparing materials processing with nanosecond, picosecond and femtosesecond pulses. The result was surprising:...

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers identify potentially druggable mutant p53 proteins that promote cancer growth

09.12.2016 | Life Sciences

Scientists produce a new roadmap for guiding development & conservation in the Amazon

09.12.2016 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

Satellites, airport visibility readings shed light on troops' exposure to air pollution

09.12.2016 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>