Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Lemongrass fiber as lost circulation material in drilling fluid

18.08.2014

Universiti Teknologi MARA researchers are investigating the properties of lemongrass fibers to help prevent fluid circulation problems while drilling for oil and gas.

In the oil and gas industry, drilling mud is used to (1) to suspend cuttings to prevent it sagging at the drill bit during shutdown, (2) to transport it to the surface, (3) to cool and lubricate the drill bit, (4) to provide enough hydrostatics pressure to prevent fluids from formation enter to the well bore and (5) to form a thin filter cake to seal the damage formation.

One of the biggest problems encountered during drilling is when the smaller particles of the drilling fluid break through into the larger void spaces in the formation, which leads to lost circulation. Lost circulation can result in blow-outs, stuck pipe, lost rig time and the leasing of wells, costing millions of dollars.

Lost circulation materials (LCM) are drilling fluid additives that are designed to make sure that the drilling fluid circulates down the hole and returns to the surface for recirculation rather than being lost to the formation drilled.

There is a wide range of LCM that is currently being applied, depending on the viability of materials and loss rates - ranging from particles, flakes and cement gunk to chemical sealants. LCM selection is usually based on cost, nature of losses, types of drilling fluid being used and sometimes on the type of formations being drilled

Universiti Teknologi MARA researchers are investigating the properties of lemongrass to be used as LCM

These days, it is increasingly necessary to drill in ultra-deep waters, which entails working in high temperature and pressure conditions. Here Oil based mud (OBM) is the more prefered mediaum to use compared to water based mud.

Therefore, a laboratory study was carried out to investigate the effect of temperature on the performance of lemongrass with different sizes of LCM in oil based mud.

It was found that different temperatures and sizes have great effects on the lemongrass LCM in the oil based mud. The optimum temperature for lemongrass LCM is 275 degrees Fahrenhite with the sizes of 250 microns.

Based on the result, it shows that lemongrass is able to perform a good LCM in OBM based on filtrate volume and filter cake thickness. The thickness of the filter cake obtained was in the range of 2 to 25 mm which satisfies the requirement from industry.

The findings also discovered that the lemongrass with the size of 150 microns is the suitable material to be used as LCM to replace conventional LCM.

Nurul Aimi Ghazali
Faculty of Chemical Engineering,
University Teknologi MARA
Malaysia
Email: nurulaimi@salam.uitm.edu.my

Darmarajah Nadarajah | Research SEA News
Further information:
http://inforec.uitm.edu.my
http://www.researchsea.com

Further reports about: UiTM circulation conditions fiber lemongrass fibers materials temperature

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht New gel-like coating beefs up the performance of lithium-sulfur batteries
22.03.2017 | Yale University

nachricht Pulverizing electronic waste is green, clean -- and cold
22.03.2017 | Rice University

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA examines Peru's deadly rainfall

24.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

What does congenital Zika syndrome look like?

24.03.2017 | Health and Medicine

Steep rise of the Bernese Alps

24.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>