Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

KorroPad: New rapid test for stainless steel surfaces

15.04.2014

KorroPad is the name given to a new rapid colour test developed at BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing that enables stainless steel surfaces to be tested inexpensively and rapidly and, most importantly, also by non-specialists.

The pleasure of many designs or components made of stainless steel sometimes declines after a short time. Instead of a beautiful metallic shininess, discoloration and stains may develop after a few months. A few optimists like the emerging ‘leopard pattern’ or lively surface, but most customers simply complain because the appearance does not meet their expectations.

The unexpected discoloration and stains can easily be explained: the protective chromium oxide layer – also called a passive layer – fails to fully develop. However, the stainless steel owes its name solely to this layer. This layer cannot be seen, thus, its defects cannot be recognised. There are a number of reasons for the protective layer to become impaired. The problems are often caused as early as during processing. But faulty semi-finished products, which are currently manufactured world-wide, lead to nonconformities in the materials’ expected corrosion resistance.

The KorroPad test enables steel surfaces to be checked immediately after processing or in the delivery state. In this way, for example, handicraft businesses can protect themselves against costly warranty claims. And this not only involves visual problems since stainless steels are also the material of choice for the manufacture of anchors, dowels and bolts, hazardous material containers and complex chemical plants. These are usually installed in such a way that an error is not obvious at the time, which can lead to safety problems. Thus KorroPad also serves safety in engineering.

Three pads are needed for a test which provides a snapshot of the state of the passive layer. The pads are about the size of a five cent coin and are placed on the stainless steel surface. First, the surface is cleaned with acetone or alcohol and the pads are then lightly pressed onto the surface to be tested. They are removed with a spatula after 15 minutes and placed on a plastic support film where they can be scanned or photographed.

15 minutes is very fast compared to other methods which often take several hours or even weeks. KorroPad also offers another advantage: the component can be further processed after the test or installed at the customer’s premises because it is virtually non-destructive.

Water and a ferric ion indicator are the ingredients of the gel-like pads. If the protective chromium oxide layer is missing on the steel surface, the indicator reacts with the iron ions in the material. The outcome is that the indicator changes its colour and blue dots appear on the slightly yellow pads. Each point indicates a spot on the steel surface where the protective passive layer was not able to develop.

Stainless steels consist of at least twelve percent chromium. The protective layer on the surface needs oxygen and water (from humidity) and a clean, bare metallic surface to be able to develop. The passive layer then seals the surface. If the protective layer cannot be formed all over the surface, corrosion occurs.

"KorroPad helps people help themselves," says Andreas Burkert who, together with Jens Lehmann, has developed the test at BAM. Visually the surfaces always look blank at the beginning. But do the components really provide what the material’s name promises in practice? Many factors play a crucial role: How has the surface been processed? How have the weld seams been treated? Are the alloying elements evenly distributed? Burkert continues: "It is like baking a cake: The ingredients alone are not enough! The dough needs to be stirred properly and the subsequent heat treatment in an oven must be at the right temperature over the right time."

Meanwhile, some companies have already used KorroPad. The quick method is also included in the teaching curriculum in vocational schools and at universities. KorroPad visualises material properties that are otherwise hidden to the human eye. And KorroPad shows students how important it is to adhere to the rules of processing. Because standards alone will not lead to a safe technical application, what counts is what actually has been implemented in practice.

Pads can be ordered via BAM’s webshop. Of course, end users can also order the test itself if needed. 100 pieces cost 390 euros, smaller packages will also soon be offered due to numerous requests. A test with three pads costs about 12 euros. The process is so simple that even laymen can perform it. A private developer can quickly and inexpensively check to see if his new stainless steel railings are of flawless quality.

The project 17136 N/1 of the Research Association GfKORR e.V. was funded by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy via AiF within the Industrial Research Promotion Programme (IGF) based on the German Bundestag’s decision.

Contact:
Dipl.-Ing. Jens Lehmann
Division 6 Materials Protection and Surface Technologies
Email: Jens.Lehmann@bam.de

BAM is a senior scientific and technical Federal Institute with responsibility to the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi).

Dr. Ulrike Rockland | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft
Further information:
http://www.bam.de

Further reports about: BAM Economic Energy Materialforschung ions processing surfaces

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht 3-D printing produces cartilage from strands of bioink
27.06.2016 | Penn State

nachricht Nanoscientists develop the 'ultimate discovery tool'
24.06.2016 | Northwestern University

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Mainz-based physicists find missing link between glass formation and crystallization

Densified regions with drastically reduced internal motion either act as crystal precursors or cluster and frustrate all further dynamics

Glasses are neither fluids nor crystals. They are amorphous solids and one of the big puzzles in condensed matter physics. For decades, the question of how...

Im Focus: Thousands on one chip: New Method to study Proteins

Since the completion of the human genome an important goal has been to elucidate the function of the now known proteins: a new molecular method enables the investigation of the function for thousands of proteins in parallel. Applying this new method, an international team of researchers with leading participation of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) was able to identify hundreds of previously unknown interactions among proteins.

The human genome and those of most common crops have been decoded for many years. Soon it will be possible to sequence your personal genome for less than 1000...

Im Focus: Optical lenses, hardly larger than a human hair

3D printing enables the smalles complex micro-objectives

3D printing revolutionized the manufacturing of complex shapes in the last few years. Using additive depositing of materials, where individual dots or lines...

Im Focus: Flexible OLED applications arrive

R2D2, a joint project to analyze and development high-TRL processes and technologies for manufacture of flexible organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) has been successfully completed.

In contrast to point light sources like LEDs made of inorganic semiconductor crystals, organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are light-emitting surfaces. Their...

Im Focus: Unexpected flexibility found in odorant molecules

High resolution rotational spectroscopy reveals an unprecedented number of conformations of an odorant molecule – a new world record!

In a recent publication in the journal Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Quantum technologies to revolutionise 21st century - Nobel Laureates discuss at Lindau

30.06.2016 | Event News

International Conference ‘GEO BON’ Wants to Close Knowledge Gaps in Global Biodiversity

28.06.2016 | Event News

ERES 2016: The largest conference in the European real estate industry

09.06.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Mainz-based physicists find missing link between glass formation and crystallization

01.07.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

Scientists observe first signs of healing in the Antarctic ozone layer

01.07.2016 | Earth Sciences

MRI technique induces strong, enduring visual association

01.07.2016 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>