Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Hohenstein researchers improve functional sportswear

06.07.2010
Tests show the wide range of thermo-physiological properties in sports textiles

German manufacturers of sports textiles are among the most innovative companies in the textile industry. Researchers at the Hohenstein Institute in Bönnigheim are helping these companies to improve the functional properties of their textiles by developing practical construction guidelines.


One of the ways of assessing the comfort characteristics of sportswear and other textiles at the Hohenstein Institute is by using the thermo-regulatory articulated manikin Charlie.


The physiological comfort characteristics of sports textiles can be represented using the German school marks system from 1 (= \"very good\") to 6 (= \"unsatisfactory\").

In a recently completed research project: (AiF No. 15481 N), with funding from the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi) provided through the Federation of Industrial Research Associations (AIF), they drew specific conclusions about the physiological comfort characteristics of a variety of different types of knitted garments. The textile industry will be able to use the construction guidelines that resulted from the research work to continue developing and optimising functional clothing for all kinds of different sports.

The research project entailed investigating a total of 34 assorted knitted fabrics in respect of their thermo-physiological characteristics. These samples varied in terms of their fibres (PES, PP, PA, WO and CO and some mixed fibres), weight per unit area (100 to 329g), surface finish (hydrophilic, bioactive) and knit structure(e.g. single-jersey or pique). Specially selected representative samples were tested in controlled trials involving volunteers wearing them in a climate-controlled room. The skin model was used to measure thermo-physiological properties, i.e. how heat and moisture are transported through the textile. When this data was combined with the results of skin sensory testing, it was possible to work out a comfort rating for each sample. The textiles were assessed along the lines of the German school marks system, from 1 = "very good" to 6 = "unsatisfactory".

On average, all the knitted sports textiles that were investigated received marks that were satisfactory or better for sports textile comfort (TK(S)). Nine samples were awarded marks of 1.0 to 1.5 (= "very good"). Chemical fibres were at a distinct advantage when it came to transporting liquid perspiration and the way they dried. On the other hand, the natural fibre samples made of wool and cotton had the edge when it came to retaining perspiration. Comparing pairs of samples of textiles where the main fibre was polyamide, but with and without a hydrophilic finish, showed that the hydrophilic finish had a negative effect on the level of comfort, because the fabric took longer to dry. However, applying a hydrophilic finish to samples made of propylene or a mixture of cotton and polypropylene gave a better result for comfort because they did not stick to the skin so much.

Contact:
Hohenstein Institute
Martin Harnisch
m.harnisch@hohenstein.de
We are grateful to the Research Association of the Textile Research Council for its financial support for IGF project no. 15481 N, which was provided using funds from the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi) via the Federation of Industrial Research Associations AIF as part of the programme to support "Industrial Community Research and Development" (IGF).

We must also thank all members of the project support committee who, with their specialist expertise and willingness to contribute to the discussions, helped ensure a successful conclusion to the project.

Rose-Marie Riedl | idw
Further information:
http://www.hohenstein.de/en/content/content1.asp?hohenstein=47-0-0-791-2010

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Serendipity uncovers borophene's potential
23.02.2017 | Northwestern University

nachricht Switched-on DNA
20.02.2017 | Arizona State University

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>