Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

First Hand from Second Hand: New Clothes from Old

04.12.2009
Dutch and German project partners, including the Laser Zentrum Hannover (LZH), are working on a production chain which will turn old clothes into new clothes.

The "heart" of the sorting line is a spectroscopy system developed by the LZH. Based on the reflection spectrum of each material in the visible and infrared range, the system will recognize not only which material it is (cotton, wool, polyester), but also the color.

Used clothes are collected in all major European countries, but what really happens to these textiles? About half are wearable and find their way back into consumer textiles. The other half are either recycled for industrial purposed, for example as insulation material, or they are disposed of. A new European project plans on offering an alternative: Making new clothes from old clothes.

Dutch and German project partners, including the Laser Zentrum Hannover (LZH), are working on a production chain which will turn old clothes into new clothes. The first step is sorting. First wearable clothes are sorted out manually. The rest are automatically sorted according to material and color. The more "pure" in material and color the batches are, the better they can be further processed. The goal of material identification is to reach a 95-99% sorting accuracy at a speed of at least 10 kilograms per minute.

The "heart" of the sorting line is a spectroscopy system developed by the LZH. Based on the reflection spectrum of each material in the visible and infrared range, the system will recognize not only which material it is (cotton, wool, polyester), but also the color. The LZH is responsible for the conception of the identity unit and the software development.

After identification and sorting, the textiles shredded and spun into new threads, which are then woven into new textiles and eventually made into new clothes.

Commercialization of the technology should lead to at least 10 sorting plants in Europe. The 30 month project is supported by the Eco-Innovation Program of the European Commission.

Contact:
Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V.
Michael Botts
Hollerithallee 8
D-30419 Hannover
Germany Tel.: +49 511 2788-151
Fax: +49 511 2788-100
E-Mail: m.botts@lzh.de
The Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) carries out research and development in the field of laser technology and is supported by the Ministry of Economic Affairs, Labour and Transport of the State of Lower Saxony (Niedersächsisches Ministerium für Wirtschaft, Arbeit und Verkehr).

Michael Botts | idw
Further information:
http://www.lzh.de

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht New pop-up strategy inspired by cuts, not folds
27.02.2017 | Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

nachricht Let it glow
27.02.2017 | Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Cells adapt ultra-rapidly to zero gravity

28.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

An Atom Trap for Water Dating

28.02.2017 | Earth Sciences

New pop-up strategy inspired by cuts, not folds

27.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>