Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

European material researchers present new materials and offer a look inside matter

02.09.2013
Professor Frank Mücklich of Saarland University is the scientific director of the conference.

When the wing of an aircraft "feels" a threatening load or metal foams become as lightweight and solid as our bones, you know materials scientists had their fingers in the pie. They search for perfect models in nature in order to give materials new capabilities. With the help of microscopy and tomography they constantly develop more precise analysis methods to look deep inside materials.


The Atom Probe Tomography makes it possible to look into the very heart of materials and determine the spatial positioning of atoms.


Oliver Dietze

They can thus better understand their structure in order to develop customised materials for the industrial, medical and energy sectors. Scientists will discuss the latest trends from September 8 to 13 at the largest European conference on materials research in Seville. Professor Frank Mücklich of Saarland University is the scientific director of the conference.

About 70 per cent of all German exports in the global market rely solely on the use of innovative materials. This is what a study by the German Academy of Science and Engineering has shown. "Materials research is of enormous importance for European competitiveness", says Frank Mücklich, Functional Materials Professor at Saarland University. He is this year’s scientific director for Europe’s largest conference on materials research, Euromat, taking place in Seville. Some 2500 scientists from all over Europe, USA, Asia, Latin America and Australia will be showcasing their latest research.

Materials research today covers a wide range of applications. The automotive industry, for example, requires strong yet light materials for car bodies and engines. They are also interested in new materials for sensors and controllers, especially for high-end automobiles. "Electromobility, however, requires materials that can store energy or ensure a stable power distribution with minimum losses. Medical technology in turn needs tiny sensors that can supply their own electricity, for example, through small temperature differences", explains Mücklich.

The Saarbrücken professor identifies several trends that scientists all over Europe are involved in. "Until very recently, materials were increasingly complex and made of a combination of many raw materials. Yet these are becoming more and more scarce, some very expensive, so we now focus on solutions that can be implemented with few materials. These can exhibit very different properties thanks to tailored microstructures. One example is carbon-based materials such as nanotubes, which are extremely strong from a mechanical point of view, but also offer a high electrical conductivity", explains Frank Mücklich. Many material researchers also turn to models from nature that over the course of evolution have developed effective systems, often with very few chemical elements.

The scientist sees another trend in the development of intelligent autonomous systems which supply themselves with energy. Such systems, for example, can "feel" supported loads and send correction signals to the system. They are used in so-called "domotics" for home energy management and monitoring. Materials research has received a big boost in recent years primarily due to new analytical methods. "We can now accurately analyse all materials not only chemically, but also illustrate the lattice structure of the crystals and show which atoms are present at which point in the material. These nanostructures can be simulated and modelled in 2D and 3D", explains Professor Mücklich. These findings allow for a first-ever complete understanding of existing materials. This helps to improve conventional materials and to develop new ones, where properties can be combined that were previously incompatible.

Materials Science and Engineering at the Saarland University campus with its about 300 scientists is one of five nationwide leading locations in this area. The current 13 professorships at the University are closely linked with the researchers at the Leibniz Institute for New Materials and the Fraunhofer Institute for Nondestructive Testing. Several Saarbrücken scientists will present their latest research findings in early September at the biggest European materials research meeting, in Seville.

Questions go to:
Prof. Dr. Frank Mücklich
Chair for functional materials at Saarland Universität
Steinbeis Research Center: Material Engineering Center Saarland (MECS)
Tel. +49 681/302-70500
Mail: muecke@matsci.uni-sb.de
Note to radio journalists: You can make telephone interviews in studio quality with scientists from Saarland University through a broadcast codec (IP connection with direct selection or through the ARD link 106813020001). For interview requests, please contact the press office (+49 681/302-3610).

Friederike Meyer zu Tittingdorf | idw
Further information:
http://euromat2013.fems.eu/
http://www.uni-saarland.de/pressefotos

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht New material for digital memories of the future
19.10.2017 | Linköping University

nachricht Electrode materials from the microwave oven
19.10.2017 | Technical University of Munich (TUM)

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Electrode materials from the microwave oven

19.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

New material for digital memories of the future

19.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

Physics boosts artificial intelligence methods

19.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>