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Engineered Nanomaterials are not generally more toxic than other materials

06.11.2013
More than ten years of safety research have shown substantial progress in the assessment of potential side effects of engineered nanomaterials for health and the environment.

The new publication about “Safety aspects of engineered nanomaterials” demonstrates that engineered nanomaterials are not generally more toxic or harmful than other materials. This new volume has been edited by Dr. Wolfgang Luther and Prof. Dr. Dr. Axel Zweck from the VDI Technologiezentrum GmbH in Düsseldorf.

For a responsible use of engineered nanomaterials a case-by-case approach is needed, taking into account specifications and realistic application scenarios. The volume summarizes the current knowledge on safety aspects of engineered nanomaterials and gives a broad insight into their economic and social implications.

This publication presents an up-to-date review of all relevant aspects of engineered nanomaterials with regard to their safety and impact on health as well as environment. The publication covers the entire life cycle of nanomaterials production, use, transport disposal and toxicological properties. Furthermore it focuses on nanomaterial exposure to man, environment, the mobility in the human body and in ecosystems.

This work also addresses regulatory and practical issues in chemical safety, occupational safety and health, consumer and environmental protection. It furthermore includes the societal and economic context, such as market potentials of nanomaterials, medical applications, public acceptance, risk communication and management.

The volume is based on the knowledge of leading experts from research and the government in the field of safety research and policy for nanomaterials.

Wolfgang Luther / Axel Zweck: Safety Aspects of Engineered Nanomaterials, Pan Stanford Publishing Pte. Ltd. 2013, 398 pages, Print ISBN: 9789814364850, eBook ISBN: 9789814364867, DOI: 10.4032/9789814364867

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.panstanford.com/books/9789814364850.html
http://www.innovationsbegleitung.de

Dr. Anja Mikler | idw
Further information:
http://www.vditz.de

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