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Development of Coating Technique by High Speed Particles with Velocity of 1,000m/s

31.08.2012
The improved process enables formation of high quality titanium alloy coating films, which had been difficult with the conventional technique.
National Institute for Materials Science
Kagoshima University
Plasma Giken Co., Ltd.

A research group in the NIMS High Temperature Materials Unit, in joint work with Kagoshima University and Plasma Giken Co., Ltd., improved the warm spray method, which is a NIMS original coating process, and increased the velocity of the sprayed particles projected on the substrate material to 1,000m/s by achieving a combustion pressure 4 times higher than that in the conventional process. The improved process enables formation of high quality titanium alloy coating films, which had been difficult with the conventional technique.
Background

Coating (formation of a film on a material) is an extremely important technology for modern industry, as it dramatically improves the heat resistance, corrosion resistance, and wear resistance of materials, essentially creating new materials with performance that did not exist in the past. In this work, a research group headed by Dr. Seiji Kuroda, Unit Director of the High Temperature Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS; President: Sukekatsu Ushioda), and Dr. Makoto Watanabe, Senior Researcher, and Dr. Hiroshi Araki, Chief Engineer, of the same unit, in joint research with Associate Professor Hiroshi Katanoda of Kagoshima University (President: Hiroki Yoshida) and a team led by Dr. Naoyuki Ohno, Director of the Engineering Department of Plasma Giken Co., Ltd. (President: Hirotaka Fukanuma), improved the warm spray method, which is a NIMS original coating process, and increased the velocity of the sprayed particles projected on the substrate material to 1,000m/s by achieving a combustion pressure 4 times higher than that in the conventional process. The improved process enables formation of high quality titanium alloy coating films, which had been difficult with the conventional technique.

When solid metal particles impact on a substrate material at high velocity, the particles are deformed to a flat shape, create depressions in the substrate, and are repelled. However, if the impact velocity exceeds a certain value, large shear plastic deformation (shear instability) is generated locally at the interface between the two, oxides and other substances on the surface are removed, and bonding occurs between the particles and the substrate. This technology was discovered in Russia in the 1980s, and a process called cold spraying, which employs this phenomenon, is now attracting attention. NIMS discovered that densification of the film can be promoted by further heating the particles to an appropriate temperature below their melting point, and named this process warm spraying in 2006. NIMS is continuing joint research and development of this technology with Kagoshima University and Plasma Giken Co., Ltd.

In the present research, Associate Prof. Katanoda, who is an expert on compressible gas-dynamics, created the basic design of the device with the aim of achieving a higher particle velocity. Plasma Giken was responsible for the actual design and manufacture of the device, and NIMS carried out the verification experiments. When the average velocity of the sprayed particles was measured by particle image velocimetry, it was found that the velocity of titanium particles with a diameter of 30ƒÊm achieved 1,000m/s under appropriate conditions.

The developed process was applied to a Ti-6Al-4V alloy, which is a type of high strength titanium alloy and is widely used in aircraft engines and similar applications. Under the optimum conditions, it was possible to obtain an alloy film with porosity of less than 1vol% and an oxygen content of 0.25 mass% (content in the raw material powder: 0.15 mass%). These results exceed the results of film forming using helium, which is an expensive working medium, in the cold spray process.

These research results were announced at the 95th Spring National Meeting of Japan Thermal Spray Society held at the Rijyo Kaikan in Hiroshima, Japan.

For more detail

Dr. Seiji Kuroda
High Temperature Materials Unit
Unit Director
TEL:+81-29-859-2444
E-Mail: KURODA.Seiji=nims.go.jp
(Please change "=" to "@")
Dr. Hiroshi Katanoda
Mechanical Engineering
Graduate School of Science and Engineering
Kagoshima University
TEL:+1-850-645-0151i10F30pm`6F30am Japan timej
E-Mail: katanoda=mech.kagoshima-u.ac.jp
(Please change "=" to "@")
Plasma Giken Co., Ltd.
Technical Manager Naoyuki Ohno
TEL: +81-48-577-1225
In Mr. Ohnofs absence, Development Department Sun Po
TEL:+81-48-577-1225
E-Mail: ohno=plasma.co.jp
(Please change "=" to "@")

For general inquiry
NIMS Public Relations Office
TEL:+81-29-859-2026
FAX:+81-29-859-2017
E-Mail:pr@nims.go.jp
Kagoshima University
Public Relations Office
TEL:+81-99-285-7035
FAX:+81-99-285-3854
Plasma Giken Co., Ltd.
Sales Office
TEL:+81-3-3980-9080
FAX:+81-3-3980-9083

Mikiko Tanifuji | Research asia research news
Further information:
http://www.nims.go.jp/eng/news/press/2012/06/p201206140.html
http://www.researchsea.com

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