Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Custom-Built Infrared Emitters for Printed Electronic Components

02.08.2013
Intelligent Solutions for Drying and Sintering Processes

Printed electronic components and printed features of electronic products are very much on the increase, providing RFID (radio frequency identification), as integral features of telephone- and credit cards (smart cards), providing protection against copying or as security features in identity cards and passes.


One custom-built infrared system can carry out several different drying and sintering processes. Copyright Heraeus Noblelight GmbH, Hanau 2013

To produce such printed electronic components, organic or metallized inks are applied to plastic foils, paper or glass. By curing, drying and sintering, the required conductive properties are achieved and at the same time the coating is firmly joined to the base material.

A newly developed infrared system, including an intelligent control unit, meets all important requirements, and this new module was shown for the first time at the LOPE-C exhibition which took place in June.

All conventional printing processes, such as screen printing, inkjet, gravure and Flexo, can be used to produce printed electronic components. The inks used are organic or metallized inks and these can be used with many materials such as paper, plastic foil or glass. Curing, drying and sintering are processes necessary to obtain the required conductivity or the semi-conducting or dielectric properties. These processes can be carried out by UV emitters, LEDs, flash lamps, hot air ovens or infrared systems.

According to which type of ink and base material is used, and which type of printing is employed (sheet-fed or offset), the manufacturer must generally replace the curing/drying/sintering source module, or install several different modules.

An innovative infrared system, including an intelligent control unit, can minimize this time wasting effort as several different drying and sintering processes can be carried with the aid of a single, custom-built infrared system. This new infrared solution is available in two versions, to allow an individual matching of the system with the ink, material, printing process and feed speed.

Version 1 employs an infrared module which is fitted with only one type of emitter. Here the requirements for the different applications are realized by means of an intelligent control unit.

Version 2 features a single infrared module fitted with various types of emitter matched to the heating zones of several drying and sintering zones. Both versions provide controllable infrared power density in the range 20 to 220kW/m2. Emitter filament temperatures are from 1,200 to 3,000°C, so that the infrared spectrum can be optimally matched with the reflection and absorption characteristics of the inks and the substrates. The optimum distance between emitter and product is also important. With tests feed speeds of up to 60 meters per minute have been be achieved.

With both infrared system versions it is no longer necessary to change the emitter, module or other components when changing over between different processes. This significantly raises a system’s productivity.

Infrared Systems Offer Significant Advantages in Printing Electronic Products.
Infrared emitters transfer energy in a contact-free manner and generate energy only in the product to be heated. They can be excellently matched with different functional materials and substrates in terms of wavelength, power and shape. Very fast response times minimize material damage in the event of unexpected feed belt stoppage or breakage.
Modern numerical methods such as Ray tracing and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) are used to ensure that heating is as homogenous as possible. The energy distribution over the material surface can be optimized, for example, by carrying out simulations prior to installation. Sophisticated reflector technology also helps to ensure that the energy is applied in the best way possible.

Heraeus, the precious metals and technology group headquartered in Hanau, Germany, is a global, private company with more than 160 years of tradition. Our fields of competence include precious metals, materials and technologies, sensors, biomaterials and medical products, quartz glass, and specialty light sources. In the financial year 2012 Heraeus generated product revenues of €4.2 billion and precious metal trading revenues of €16 billion. With more than 12,200 employees in over 100 subsidiaries worldwide, Heraeus holds a leading position in its global markets.

Heraeus Noblelight GmbH with its headquarters in Hanau and with subsidiaries in the USA, Great Britain, France, China and Australia, is one of the technology- and market-leaders in the production of specialist light sources. In 2012, Heraeus Noblelight had an annual turnover of 92,5 Million € and employed 715 people worldwide. The organization develops, manufactures and markets infrared and ultraviolet emitters and systems for applications in industrial manufacture, environmental protection, medicine and cosmetics, research, development and analytical measurement techniques.

Heraeus Noblelight acquired on January 31, 2013 the Fusion UV Systems group headquartered in Gaithersburg, Maryland (USA).

For further information contact:

Reader:
Heraeus Noblelight GmbH
Reinhard-Heraeus-Ring 7
D-63801 Kleinostheim
Tel +49 6181/35-8545, Fax +49 6181/35-16 8545
E-Mail hng-infrared@heraeus.com
Press:
Dr. Marie-Luise Bopp
Heraeus Noblelight GmbH,
Tel +49 6181/35-8547, Fax +49 6181/35-16 8547
E-Mail marie-luise.bopp@heraeus.com

Dr. Marie-Luise Bopp | Heraeus Noblelight GmbH
Further information:
http://www.heraeus-noblelight.com/infrared

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht New gel-like coating beefs up the performance of lithium-sulfur batteries
22.03.2017 | Yale University

nachricht Pulverizing electronic waste is green, clean -- and cold
22.03.2017 | Rice University

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Inactivate vaccines faster and more effectively using electron beams

23.03.2017 | Life Sciences

New study maps space dust in 3-D

23.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Tracing aromatic molecules in the early universe

23.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>